Hemmings Find of the Day – 1968 Pontiac GTO

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1968 Pontiac GTO

1968 Pontiac GTO

From the seller’s description:

Thanks for looking at my 1968 Pontiac GTO. The 1968 model is one of the most desirable years, and was awarded Motor Trend Car of the Year. This GTO is a stunning examp­­le having the correct Verdero Green finish with a black vinyl top and black interior and bucket seats. A frame-off restoration of this numbers matching coupe was completed in 2016, sparing no expense.

The 400 cubic inch V8 was rebuilt to factory specs and is backed by the GM Turbo Hydramatic transmission. Dual exhausts, make the GTO sound as good as it looks. Less than 1000 miles since restoration.

Options include factory air, power steering and brakes, front disc brakes, AM/FM radio, tachometer, Michelin red line radial tires.

Bottom line is, hop in and enjoy, its ready to drive in my opinion short trips or long.

1968 Pontiac GTO 1968 Pontiac GTO 1968 Pontiac GTO 1968 Pontiac GTO

Pricetag

Price
$41,900

Location Marker

Location
Spartanburg, South Carolina

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Pontiacs for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Ford’s other right-hand man: P.E. Martin and the development of the assembly line

Ford’s other right-hand man: P.E. Martin and the development of the assembly line

Photo courtesy Ford Media.

[Editor’s Note: In 1922, Henry Ford issued his book, My Life and My Work, which was largely a book about his philosophy of business and he omitted many details about his work. In 1944, in an interview with Fortune magazine, Henry stated clearly and simply that he and P.E. Martin invented the automobile assembly line. So who was P.E. Martin? The new ebook P. E. Martin: The Origins of The Automotive Industry seeks to answer that question and many others in great detail.]

For the first few years, Ford manufactured average-priced cars and a few expensive cars: Models A, B, C, F, K, N, R, and S. In addition, there were experimental models that were not produced. The stockholders wanted to provide high-end cars with high-end margins. The beautiful Model K was the first Ford with a six-cylinder engine and the last one until the 1940s. The largest investor, Malcolmson, departed after the Model K flop. Ford and the finance officer James Couzens believed the key to survival was manufacturing an economic car. People didn’t expect Ford to produce luxurious cars like the Model K, and were disinclined to buy a luxury car from Ford.

In April 1904, Ford bought land on Piquette Avenue in Detroit, built his first plant, and, by 1906, Peter Ed (P.E.) Martin was put in charge of the Assembly Department for what was to be the Model T car, working under manager Thomas Walburn. Design on the Model T proceeded through 1907, with P.E. working alongside Ford constructing the process for manufacturing the Model T. Henry Ford developed such confidence in P.E. that, in April 1908, six weeks after announcing to the world that the Model T had arrived, P.E. was made plant manager. During this time, P.E. and a team of engineers worked on the flow of manufacturing and methods of simplifying the process and increasing productivity. The result of their efforts was the birth of the Assembly Line concept, breaking down manufacturing into simple solitary components/processes that could be done by unskilled labor as the product proceeded along a moving assembly line. This one accomplishment revolutionized manufacturing and the way all products, from cars to appliances to computers, were made ever after.

In 1910, manufacturing was moved to a factory in Highland Park where P.E. again was put in charge. By 1913, the Assembly Line manufacturing process was implemented fully and the Model T began moving off the line so cheaply, and at such speed, that Henry’s dream of a vehicle for the common man became a reality. By 1920, Henry had built the largest factory in the United States and the world, the Rouge Plant. Both the Rouge and the Highland Park plant were now under P.E.’s supervision.

Long before the term lean production was coined, P.E. was mastering the concept with hundreds and hundreds of conveyors throughout the plants. Necessity is the mother of invention. There are many stories about who invented the moving assembly line and whether or not they used rails and a windlass to pull the cars during testing of the concept, but there was no doubt in P.E. Martin’s mind this entire process had to be linear, in one direction, and on one floor, and the pace of assembly in all the sub-departments and from all the vendors had to be tied to the rate of production and movement on the mainline. Years later, Henry insisted that he and P.E. invented the original assembly line at Ford Motor Company.

There is much debate about who and when and how the first concepts for the moving assembly line were tested at Piquette. Some say the test vehicle was dragged by ropes. Others claim they used a windlass. Others say they pulled the vehicles on carts with wheels. But, in all cases the fundamental difference was the line moved somewhat automatically. All of this testing was done late on Saturdays and was demonstrated early on Sundays, so they could dismantle the test and restart production. A few things were apparent: the worker would be limited to a few steps, the line speed needed to be adjustable or different between subassembly lines and the main line, and the fewer steps the worker had the faster the line could run. This last point had been clearly established on the magneto line. The workers stood in place and pushed the assembly “down the line” to the next worker. Although the line wasn’t automatic, P.E. could set the desired production rate based on the division of labor, placement of tools, etc. So all the pieces were in place and it was up to Henry, Albert Kahn, and P.E. to layout the inside of Highland Park. In January 1910, Henry started the move to the new plant; P.E. was plant superintendent.

Assembling magnetos for Model Ts in 1913. Photo courtesy Ford Media.

How the final version came to be was open to discussion and working the details. P.E.’s vision was the future Highland Park facility. In 1908, P.E. and a small team tested the final assembly line concept in the Piquette Avenue plant on successive Sundays. William Avery and William Klann recalled years later that Charles Sorensen was not part of the team and did not participate in the testing. The first assembly line for production was started at the Highland Park plant in October 1913. Klann was the supervisor for motor assembly and Avery was a newly graduated industrial engineer. Together with P.E., they designed the first automated final assembly line in Highland Park. The original plans and layouts for Highland Park did not include an automated final assembly line. Henry’s plan was to provide more space to build more cars, but he encouraged P.E. to experiment. Contrary to Charles, there was no automated line at Piquette, because P.E. had determined there was inadequate space. Moreover, when Ford moved the plant to Highland Park, Charles was in charge of the foundry and shipping. Charles was a naysayer not a contributor to the vehicle assembly line at Highland Park. After the first line was installed, it was so successful that four more lines were quickly added. The only conveyor lines that were familiar to Charles were the conveyors in the foundry to move sand and castings, and to pour steel. Henry had borrowed this idea from breweries that used conveyors to move grain and other raw materials.

The overall plan was simple. Quality was a given. Price was king. Volume was the goal. The Model T changed significantly over the years. There were thousands of cost reductions, and equal or greater number of corresponding engineering changes to reduce weight and simplify assembly. Gradually, stamped metal parts replaced wood parts, which facilitated assembly. With the automated assembly line in full swing, Highland Park reached peak production at more than 9,000 units per day, an unimaginable figure. Even as sales slowed due to competition and as the market for trade-up cars grew, the volume was strong. Ford was building 50% of the cars in the world. P.E. helped establish Ford of Canada in 1910 and Henry exported his model around the globe and to additional factories in the USA.

[P.E. Martin: The Origins of The Automotive Industry is available now as an ebook through Amazon.]


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1970 Mercury Marauder X-100

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1970 Mercury Marauder X-100

Garage-find 1970 Mercury Marauder X-100 for sale on Hemmings.com. From the seller’s description:

92,691 original miles
8-cyl. 429cid

Good condition, some rust around wheel wells. Original paint, most original parts except for brakes, tires, etc. Has been sitting in an attached 2-car garage since 2000. Hasn’t been started since then. It’s the would-a, could-a, should-a car that got left behind when things took a turn for the worse health wise. Original owner now willing to sell. Will not give this car away. For those of you asking, I’m not a mechanic so I can’t answer all your mechanical questions. The underside of the car looks pretty clean. There is some surface rust, but everything else looks pretty solid. I added a few photos of the wheel wells in the back and the underside. Happy to answer any and all questions. There is a custom trailer hitch attached to the frame of the car. The vehicle was moved(driven and running just fine) to the garage a long time ago to make room for a project car and everyone forgot this car was sitting over here. The battery was taken out long ago.

Comes with extra parts: bumper, quarter panel, hood, Inner and Outer all original brand new OEM Wheel Wells, and whatever is sitting in the trunk.

Pricetag

Price
$5,950

Location Marker

Location
Cleveland, Ohio

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

See more Mercurys for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Four-Links – San Francisco’s fire trucks, Mini-based beach buggies, Piquette’s window restorers, world’s tallest gas pump

Four-Links – San Francisco’s fire trucks, Mini-based beach buggies, Piquette’s window restorers, world’s tallest gas pump

San Francisco’s got an impressive collection of its former fire trucks, including one that fought the 1906 fire, but seeing them is problematic because they’re essentially couch surfing across the city, going from temporary home to temporary home, according to a recent San Francisco Examiner column. The caretakers for the collection have asked the city council for help with a permanent home, so hope for the collection’s future may still exist. (via)

* To coincide with his summer holiday, Jeroen Booij recently put together this look at some of the Mini-based beach buggies put together over the years.

* The Detroit Free Press this week took some time to feature the all-volunteer crew steadily restoring the windows of the Ford Piquette Avenue plant.

* It won’t dispense any gasoline, but the world’s largest gas pump recently went up in Sapulpa, Oklahoma.

* Not all of the Chrysler Turbine cars remained in North America during their public evaluation period. Chrysler sent one on a world tour, as documented by this video that King Rose Archives uploaded a few years ago and that Silodrome recently pointed to. Wonder if that Turbine is one of the cars that Chrysler later destroyed?


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Open Diff: Is the internal combustion engine on borrowed time?

Open Diff: Is the internal combustion engine on borrowed time?

Pontiac GTO

389-cu.in. Tri-Power V-8 beneath the hood of a 1964 Pontiac GTO. Photo by author.

On July 5, automaker Volvo Cars announced that every vehicle it launches after 2019 will be powered — in part or whole — by an electric motor. The next day, in an effort to meet ambitious pollution control targets, France proclaimed that new gasoline and diesel-powered vehicle sales would be banned by 2040, with ecology minister Nicholas Hulot calling the move a “veritable revolution.”

On July 25, Britain chimed in as well, announcing a similar ban on sales of new gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles, specifically stating that the regulation would extend to hybrid vehicles as well as those powered only by fossil fuels. The two countries aren’t alone: Beginning in 2025, all new cars sold in Norway must be electric or plug-in hybrid, the Netherlands is considering a comparable ban with the same cut-off year. Even states in Germany, home of the Autobahn, are discussing a ban on gasoline and diesel-powered new vehicles, beginning as early as 2030.

It’s easy to dismiss the moves enacted by France and Britain, as 2040 is, at this writing, still 23 years in the future. That said, one cannot mandate the implementation of technology that doesn’t yet exist, and for electric cars to become a practical solution to fossil-fuel-powered ones, a quantum-leap in battery technology must occur.

Proliferation of electric vehicles also raises a multitude of other issues. Can the existing power grid support the increased demand? Will countries need to invest in new power plants, and if so, how will that power be produced? These are questions that must be addressed, but not in this forum.

Are we staring at the sunset of the internal combustion engine? After years of talk about peak oil and declining resources, will it be environmental regulations that finally close the door on the technology that gave mobility to most of the world’s population? If fossil-fueled new cars are banned, how long before governments enact laws banning existing internal combustion vehicles, too?

Or, is it much ado about nothing, particularly if advances in battery technology (or other propulsion methods) and investments in infrastructure don’t materialize? Will we see the 2040 dates (or even the 2025 dates) pushed back as questions remain unanswered?


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

HOT ROD MILESTONES

HOT ROD MILESTONES

Three Hot Rods, 231 Years of Rod History

The Isky T, Elvis Car and Leham-Leonardo Roadster

Today there remains a large number of hot rods from the pre-war era (read: original hot rods), but few of those survivors can boast a story that these three roadsters offer. The trio of black beauties originated from Southern California at about the same time, 1940, and collectively they represent more than 230 years of hot rod history. That alone is an amazing fact, but of more interest, the original owners happened to be best friends when they built their hot rods, and they completed their builds at about the same time, lending each other helping hands from start to finish.

The two A-V8 roadsters were built by John Athan and Herman Leham, gentlemen who are now deceased. The T roadster was built by one of the most colorful figures in automotive lore today, famous camshaft builder Ed Iskenderian, better known as the Camfather in some circles, or simply Isky in others. All three men were instrumental during rodding’s formative years.

Beyond the personalities, the cars themselves remain rolling tributes to how hot rods were built before the days of overweight mail-order catalogs and ready-to-mount billet parts. Poke your nose under the chassis of any of these roadsters and you’re treated to a history lesson in how the shade tree mechanics that eventually became known as hot rodders skillfully made do with what components they could in order to complete their cars.

HOT ROD MILESTONES

History lesson number one: The Isky T. That unique grille and radiator shell? The combo is a cut-down and spliced-together version using two Pontiac front sections. The car’s juice brakes were pirated from an early Plymouth (Fords didn’t come with hydraulic brakes until 1940, the same year these roadsters were finished and on the road), and the 1924 Model T body rests on a modified Essex frame. That curious-looking engine? It started as an original (that is, 1932) Ford flathead V8 that Isky modified, using Maxi heads originally intended for commercial Ford trucks; the heads mount the exhaust valve/port topside, while the intake valves remain in the engine block. Isky fabricated the copper head gaskets himself, and to the best of anyone’s knowledge they’re still the originals he crafted back in the 1940s.

Ultimately, Isky’s mongrel engine pumped a compression ratio of 13:1, and the tri-carb motor propelled the car to a top speed of 120 MPH at El Mirage. Incidentally, those huge 16-inch whitewall tires are ancient, showing cracks in their sidewalls that were first exposed to air decades ago.

The Elvis Car has an equally colorful past. Built by John Athan, the A-V8 earned its nickname after appearing in the 1957 Elvis Presley movie Loving You. Athan happened to live near an outfit – Pacific Auto Rental – that supplied cars as props for Hollywood movies, which led to the Elvis movie gig. Following its appearance in The King’s movie, the roadster served as a prop in a couple other big-screen features, and later a gas station documentary. Athan was rather nonchalant about his car’s notoriety, too, years ago telling me: “I didn’t know who Elvis Presley was [at the time].” Athan said that, following brief instructions on how to drive the roadster, Presley did all right behind the wheel. “He could get around in that car,” cited Athan.

The car itself is a thing of A-V8 wonder, sporting its 59AB engine in front of a ’39 Ford transmission that leads to a ’39 Mercury rear-end packed with 3.54:1 gears, all hung within the classic ’32 Ford frame rails. This was all cutting-edge technology when the car was completed in 1940. And shortly after the car rolled onto the street, Athan pointed it to El Mirage for the Road Rebels’ dry lake meet where the car posted a top speed of 108.5 MPH.

And if you’re wondering about the Elvis Car’s odd-shaped windshield, here’s the skinny: The glass originated as the rear window for a 1939 Chrysler. Athan liked its contour, so he popped the glass out of the sedan’s molding and then fabricated a frame of his own. Pure hot rod funk.

Speaking of funk, in later years the car sat idle in Athan’s garage where rodents, spiders, dust, and even rain wreaked havoc on its black lacquer paint and leather upholstery. Finally, in 1997, Athan commissioned his friend Tom Leonardo to restore the car. Leonardo, who happens to now own the Leham A-V8, took the car to bare metal before giving it the look you see today. The car later was part of the Smithsonian Museum’s “America on the Move” exhibit in Washington, D.C., before residing at the Petersen Automotive Museum for nearly two years prior to reporting back to the Smithsonian again, where it remains for the time being following John Athan’s passing last summer.

Had Leonardo needed to reference anything about an A-V8 (which he didn’t) for the Elvis Car’s rebuild, he could have turned to his roadster, which was originally built by Herman Leham. Leonardo bought the car from Leham in the mid-1970s, and has owned it ever since. The ‘29 was meticulously built by Leham, who was a perfectionist, and Leonardo treats the cool little roadster with the same TLC to this day. After giving it fresh paint and upholstery, plus rejuvenating various other components, the car resides in its own garage stall.

Moreover, the Leham roadster’s chassis and suspension components are tight and in good working order – I know because I’ve taken several rides in the two-seater, the payback being a wonderful trip back in time. As for the car’s underpinnings, it’s pure pre-1941 hardware, right down to the 1938 Willys steering box, Kelsey-Hayes 16-inch wheels, Auburn dash, 1939 Ford taillights and running gear. And who among us can slight that classic push bar up front?

Speaking as an enthusiast, though, my affection runs deep for each of these cars because not only did I manage to photograph them simultaneously at the NHRA Museum in Pomona back in 2003, but I featured them independently in several of my hot rod books. The Isky T and Elvis Car first appeared in Hot Rod Milestones (1999) and the Leham-Leonardo Roadster was the cover car for Ford Hot Rods (1998). Some of the photos for this article were taken in 2003 just days before the Elvis Car was shipped to D.C. for the Smithsonian exhibit. But whether in a museum or out on the open road, all three hot rods remain fixtures in American hot rodding’s storied past.

By Dain Gingerelli

HOT ROD MILESTONES
HOT ROD MILESTONES
HOT ROD MILESTONES
HOT ROD MILESTONES

The post HOT ROD MILESTONES appeared first on Car Kulture Deluxe.


Source: CKDeluxe

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog Type 404

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog Type 404

1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog

From the seller’s description:

1966 Unimog S Type 404. This is a very clean, very original and complete cab and chassis that was imported as a fire truck. It has been converted to a working hydraulic dump bed.The dump bed is believed to be an original Unimog unit but the hydraulics are “Energy Mfg, Co.” An original PTO winch is included. This Unimog has spent the last several years in dry storage but starts, runs, drives, and stops. Very clean rust free unit with newer paint on the cab. Currently located in Sheridan WY. Clear title.

1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog

Pricetag

Price
$16,000

Location Marker

Location
Sheridan, Wyoming

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

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Source: www.hemmings.com/blog