Jaguar Classic to resume D-type production

Jaguar Classic to resume D-type production

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

The continuation D-type engineering prototype. Photos courtesy Jaguar Land Rover.

Introduced in 1954, Jaguar’s D-type was a revolutionary sports racer built with one primary goal in mind: victory in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The D-type would take wins at the storied endurance classic from 1955-’57, but rule changes left the car largely uncompetitive in 1958. Production of the D-type ended in 1956, but 62 years later, Jaguar Classic will again offer 25 customers the ability to purchase a new, for-competition-use-only example.

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

The D-type borrowed heavily from Jaguar’s race-proven C-type, which had won Le Mans in 1951 and 1953. The 3.4-liter, six-cylinder XK engine carried over — wearing a “wide angle” cylinder head with larger valves — as did the Dunlop disc brakes with quick-change calipers. The D-type differed in shape from it’s predecessor, boasting a more aerodynamic form with a smaller frontal area for a higher top speed. More significantly, its construction was ground-breaking.

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

While the C-type used a tubular frame like most conventional racing cars of the period, the D-type borrowed its construction methods from the aircraft industry, using a central aluminum monocoque combined with front and rear subframes. The net result was a lighter chassis, but one that did not suffer a loss of torsional rigidity. Early D-types were built with lightweight aluminum or magnesium subframes, but in 1955 Jaguar switched to bolted steel components to facilitate crash repair.

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

Five works D-types were completed in 1954, and the cars may well have scored a victory in their initial outing at the Circuit de la Sarthe, had it not been for performance issues caused by sediment in the fuel supply. Even with this handicap, a D-type driven by Duncan Hamilton and Tony Rolt finished second in the 1954 race, one lap down to the winning Ferrari 375 Plus. A works Jaguar D-type scored a win in 1955, but the victory was marred by the tragic deaths of 83 spectators, and Mercedes-Benz driver Pierre Levegh, in a fiery crash.

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

In anticipation of customer demand, Jaguar set aside 100 chassis numbers for the D-type in 1955. Privateer buyers included Scotland’s Ecurie Ecosse, which posted wins at Le Mans with their blue and white D-types in 1956 and 1957, as well as American Briggs Cunningham, who, with driver Mike Hawthorne, managed a victory at Sebring in 1955 with a “borrowed” works car. A total of 75 D-type chassis tags were used that year, leaving 25 in reserve.

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

In 1956, rule changes saw displacement grow from 3.4 liters to 3.8 liters, and the XK engine’s trio of Weber carburetors was replaced by fuel injection. Long-nose bodywork for the D-type, which further improved high-speed stability, was introduced by Jaguar at Le Mans, but by the end of the third quarter the British automaker began to question the amount of time and money spent developing competition cars. To stay on top, Jaguar would need to design a successor for the D-type, whose sales had already slowed to a trickle, and doing so would impact the passenger car side of its business. Faced with this reality, Jaguar ended its involvement with motorsports on October 13, 1956.

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

To rid itself of the remaining D-type inventory, Jaguar began production of the road-legal-but-track-capable XKSS, intending to build 25 examples. A February 1957 fire at Browns Lane ended these plans, and for decades both the XKSS and the remaining D-types were little more than footnotes to history.

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

Following upon its success with the continuation E-type Lightweight (six examples built 2014-’15) and continuation XKSS (nine examples built 2017-’18), Jaguar Classic recently announced a continuation series D-type, limited to the 25 chassis numbers remaining from 1955. Customers will be able to choose from short-nose (1955) or long-nose (1956) bodywork, and engine options will include both the Weber carburetor-fed 3.4-liter and the fuel-injected 3.8-liter inline sixes.

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

The engineering prototype debuted at this year’s Salon Rétromobile in Paris, France, and Jaguar insists that production examples will be faithful to the specifications set by Jaguar’s competition and engineering departments in 1955. Kev Riches, Jaguar Classic’s engineering manager, said of the division’s latest offering,

Recreating the nine D-type-derived XKSS models was hugely satisfying, and an even bigger technical challenge than the six missing Lightweight E-type models, but lessons learned from the XKSS project have given us a head start on the final 25 D-type models. Each one will be absolutely correct, down to the very last detail, just as Jaguar’s Competitions Department intended.

Jaguar Classic continuation D-type

Pricing of each continuation D-type will vary based upon configuration and options selected by the customer, and Jaguar’s policy is to not disclose this confidential information. That said, and in keeping with past continuation models, expect the D-type price to start “in excess of” £1,000,000, or $1.39 million based upon current exchange rates.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1964 Ford Thunderbird convertible

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1964 Ford Thunderbird convertible

1964 Ford Thunderbird convertible

Restored 1964 Ford Thunderbird convertible for sale. From the seller’s description:

Got a little carried away with this one. Have over 40,000 into it and know I’ll take a licking. Everything was either new or rebuilt including 390 ci motor and automatic transmission. Radiator, gas tank, chrome and dual exhaust all new. Fabric on conv top is of Mercedes quality. Has power steering and power brakes. No AC. Runs and drives like a new car. Has a clear Arizona title.

1964 Ford Thunderbird convertible 1964 Ford Thunderbird convertible 1964 Ford Thunderbird convertible

Pricetag

Price
$27,000

Location Marker

Location
Apache Junction, Arizona

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Fords for sale on Hemmings.com.

Editor’s note: The purpose of the “Find of the Day” is to promote interesting cars from our classifieds. These are not the actual ads, so to view more images or contact the seller with questions, click on the hyperlink (underlined green text), which will take you to the classified ad itself.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Fast and furious, circa 1962: The further adventures of a hot-rodding teen

Fast and furious, circa 1962: The further adventures of a hot-rodding teen

The legendary Chevy 409 met its match one summer night in ’62. Photo via Hemmings Archive.

[Editor’s Note: Jim Van Orden of Richardson, Texas, regales us again with tales of his wayward youth spent in fast cars. This week he recalls street racing against a 409-powered Chevrolet.]

The baby-blue 1940 Ford convertible with top down, engine straining, was doing 90 miles per hour. Wearing no seat belt and sweating, I suddenly imagined myself flying like a cannonball from the rear seat and landing head first on the pavement.

We were side-by-side, but losing, to a 1961 Pontiac Bonneville on a dark stretch of dangerous three-lane highway called “Seven Bridges Road” near Springfield, New Jersey. Heading straight at us as we rocketed forward in the middle lane were the high beams of an oncoming car.

Heart pumping like crazy, I was eternally grateful when the Ford’s driver, a high school buddy, slowed and pulled behind the Pontiac…just in time. His car, named “Blue Moon” after the hit rock-and-roll song that year, was fast—it had a 1955 Corvette engine—but no match for the big-block Bonneville.

The wild summer of ’62
That’s the way things went that summer of 1962. Fast and furious…punctuated by beer drinking, drag racing, cute girls at the New Jersey shore, and dirty hands from hours working on hotrods. Grease under fingernails was a boy’s badge of honor. My friends and I were 18, high school graduates, and feeling our oats.

Hotrods were hotrods back then and the word “ratrod” didn’t exist. But another friend, Barry, had a 1934 Ford five-window coupe, hand-sprayed in different shades of primer, deserving of that title. Devoid of fenders and bumpers, top chopped four inches and interior stripped of headliner, seats and window cranks, the car was a missile on wheels.

Barry’s 1934 Ford was powered by a 365-inch Cadillac V8 bolted to a La Salle transmission. It was the fastest car in town. But could it beat the 409 Chevy? Photo courtesy Barry.

Sitting prominently in front was a 1953 Cadillac 331-inch V-8—bored to 365 inches—sporting chrome valve covers and three two-barrel carburetors. A three-foot-long metal gearshift rod jutting from the floor connected to a three-speed La Salle top-loader transmission sitting between two seat cushions.

There were a few gauges—speedometer, oil and generator—on the dash. Simple switches controlled headlights and a single windshield wiper motor. Although the car had shocks and springs, skinny tires transmitted every road noise they encountered through the metal floorboard. At least our butts had an inch of foam rubber to sit on.

There was an alley behind Barry’s house and I’d join him and others in his driveway at night for beer drinking, car building and storytelling. A spotlight on the garage wall kept us talking, laughing and working into the wee hours of the morning. I’m sure neighbors trying to sleep hated our guts.

When it came to cars, Barry was a mechanical genius. Using no special tools, he single-handedly took apart the Caddy engine and rebuilt it without consulting a repair manual. And when he started it the first time, it roared to life and settled down into a whisper-quiet idle. I was in awe of the handsome engine, which had dual exhausts, tiny chrome air cleaners and produced around 300 horsepower…more than enough to turn a 1,200-pound car into a rocket.

It took most of the spring, but by late May the Ford was ready for its maiden run. Nothing in all my years of motoring compared to that ride. Everything—sights, sounds and sensations—was in bold relief. The Caddy engine boomed through mufflers directly under our butts, La Salle gears whined with metal-on-metal machinations (Barry added 140-weight gear oil to silence the synchronizers), mechanical brakes squealed like tortured pigs and exposed, fender-less tires—spinning at eye level only a few feet away—roared louder as our speed increased.

The world and highway presented themselves while looking out a five-inch-tall windshield…an act requiring bending heads low and lifting eyeballs high. Forget about rear visibility. The Ford had no rearview mirror. But it didn’t matter because the back window was even smaller than the front windshield.

It was all about raw power and spectacular acceleration. And it only took a few miles of driving to attract policemen in a squad car, who pulled us over for an inspection. They seemed more concerned with the car’s design and mechanical functions than our high-speed, stupid antics. Looking hard at every aspect of the car, it was obvious they didn’t like what they saw. Their goal was to get the car off the road.

There were tense discussions over the car’s lack of fenders. But realizing nothing violated the law, they turned to their last resort. Taking out a tape, an officer measured the single rear taillight and, much to his satisfaction, determined it was too close to the pavement. Although a minor violation, it resulted in the car being impounded.

Off to the police pound we drove, where the car took up residency until Barry could tow it home. A few weeks later, he fixed the Ford’s taillight “deficiency” and it was street-worthy again. I couldn’t wait to see how fast the car was…and I would soon find out.

The 409 in my future
One of the fastest cars in ’62 was the 409-cubic-inch Chevy with two four-barrel carbs and four-speed floor shift. The car was famous from the start. So much so the Beach Boys sang its praises in their hit song “409,” a silly—but chart-topping—single that assaulted teen ears with clever lyrics such as “Giddy-up, Giddy-up 409…she’s real fine my 409.”

The 1962 Chevy 409 had a 409 cubic-inch V8 and two four-barrel carburetors. It was one of the fastest cars on the road…and the one we met at the Adventure Car Hop wanted to race. Photo via Hemmings Archive.

I was a small-block Chevy V-8 fan. But it was a new ball game when the 348-inch big-block V-8 showed up in 1958. Disappointment set in, however, when riding in a friend’s Impala convertible with automatic transmission. Although the car’s 348-inch V-8 put out 250 horsepower, it couldn’t keep up with a ’57 Chevy with small-block 283-inch V-8 and four-speed.

More cubic inches were needed. Then, late in 1961, GM got serious and introduced an expanded version of the 348, the famed 409-inch big-block. It had all the right stuff, too, with increased compression and two four-barrel carbs. And it didn’t disappoint when installed with a four-speed in Chevy’s lightest sedans. A version called “Old Reliable,” built by race team Strickler & Jenkins, was running the quarter mile in 13.20s and at 110 MPH.

The first 409 Chevy I saw, a black Impala, galloped up one summer night at the Adventure Car Hop on Rt. 22 in Union, New Jersey. The driver, a guy with sideburns and a tight-lipped sneer, made it obvious he wanted to race Barry’s Ford. Such duels were signaled by hard, deadly stares between “combatants,” followed by loud throttle blips creating 5,000-RPM engine repercussions through glasspack mufflers.

The Adventure Car Hop was the perfect arena. Every Saturday night it crawled with young men, blood boiling and brains saturated with testosterone, looking for girls and challenges. They tooled through the parking lot, exhausts rapping, while occasionally doing 10-foot burn-outs. A cacophony of ear-splitting rock-and-roll—from Chuck Berry to Little Richard—poured from open windows, along with cigarette smoke and perfume, and filled the night air.

Prior to spotting the 409, Barry and I had our egos stoked by guys and their girlfriends who yelled praises for the Ford. The parade of hotrods crossing our path was endless and provoked discussions, debates and arguments. So many important, unanswered questions: Which car was fastest, had the most horsepower or could burn rubber the longest?

You knew immediately when a race was about to happen. Hastily downing burgers and shakes, removing window trays and starting engines, billows of blue smoke fouling the air, car after car rapidly departed the lot in full pursuit of the “contestants.” You had to be quick to see the race. Usually, all I saw was a long line of taillights and the victor, first to return on the opposite side of the highway, heading back to the Adventure.

Just as we were about to leave, the 409 Chevy pulled alongside Barry’s Ford at a turn-around. The stage was set. But fast-paced Friday night traffic fueled by drivers anxious to pull in for their burger-and-shake fix, made it impossible to move out. Barry, a dark-haired version of John Milner in “American Graffiti,” was ready. Gears clashed with a loud, angry grinding mash of steel on steel as he shifted the old La Salle tranny into first.

Finally, there was a break in traffic and both cars lurched forward with wheels spinning, valves and pistons pounding. My head snapped back as the Caddy V-8 quickly reached redline.

Looking to the side, I was amazed to see we were ahead by more than a car’s length. Engine heat poured through holes in the thin firewall, which had no insulation. The raucous exhaust of both cars made conversation impossible. It appeared we were beating—handily—the car legend called “409.”

Then tragedy struck. As Barry threw a speed shift, the La Salle tranny jammed between first and second gears. It had happened before and was the result of worn synchronizers.

“No, this can’t be happening,” my brain screamed. In dismay, we watched the 409 streak ahead and disappear into night traffic. My sense of justice was violated. I was pissed. We could have won…and we should have.

Oh, well, you should see faces—and hear laughter—when I tell this story to owners of 409 Chevys and ’34 Ford hotrods at car shows.

“The Chevy would have won anyway,” the 409 owners usually tell me.

“It’s too bad your friend didn’t have a decent tranny behind that Caddy V-8…he would have won hands down,” the ’34 Ford owners argue in rebuttal.

I know the ’34 Ford would have won… but I’ve learned to keep my opinions to myself (except now, of course).

As I think about that ratrod ’34 Ford and the wild summer of ’62, I’m just grateful my friends and I survived and can share great car memories. “Giddy-up 409.”

Barry’s ’34 Ford would have beaten the 409 Chevy. But a missed shift slowed her down. Photo courtesy Barry.

Footnote
Barry sold the ’34 Ford at summer’s end, but not before removing the Caddy V-8 and transplanting it into another car…a cherry 1953 Studebaker that originally had an automatic and 85-hp inline six.

Mated to a three-speed manual transmission, the V-8 made the “Studillac” (pictured above) as fast as the ’34 Ford. As proof of the engine’s longevity, it still runs strong today and powers a ’32 Chrysler owned by Barry’s brother, Justin (pictured below).

 


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find(s) of the Day – pair of 1987 Subaru GLs

Hemmings Find(s) of the Day – pair of 1987 Subaru GLs

One for resto, one for parts pair of 1987 Subaru GLs for sale on Hemmings.com. From the seller’s description:

A nearly matched pair of 1987 Subaru GL Wagons. Both have a 1.8 liter , 4 cylinder engine, 4-wheel drive with high and low range, 5-speed manual transmission, power steering and power brakes. Both have carburetors — no fuel injection or computers. They are the same color inside and outside.

Subaru #1 is very driveable. We drove it daily for many years until recently when we bought something else. It starts, runs and drives good. It has even been driven over a mountain pass during blizzard conditions with no problems.

Subaru #2 runs, but only on 3 cylinders. and has a low brake pedal. It has good compression on three cylinders but has zero on the fourth. It probably has a bad or sticky lifter or valve on that cylinder. It also has a bad gas tank.

Subaru #1 has had regular maintenance. It has new axle shafts in front, new front wheel bearings, rebuilt carburetor, new ball joints, new strut bar bushings and new timing belts and gears. The brakes work well and have a lot of wear left, but there is a right front shimmy under a quick stop (warped rotor?). The rear wheel bearings will probably need to be greased or replaced.

Subaru #1 also has 4 new M&S winter tires (General Altimax Arctic) and wheels with less than 10,000 miles on them. The tires on Subaru #2 are in fair condition. Subaru #1 has a front grill and a good battery; #2 has a fair battery and no grill.

Subaru #1 has an odometer reading of 228,507; #2 has a reading of 186,971,

Subaru #2 has air conditioning (not tested); #1 does not. Interior on both is fairly good. Subaru #2 has a partly sun-faded dash and some wear on the driver’s seat with seat covers.

Subaru #1 has a replacement windshield. Subaru #2 has a crack in the windshield. All other glass is good. Some outside trim is missing on both vehicles. There is a little rust on lower rear quarters. The worst spot is shown in the pics.

I have several service manuals and the original owners manual that will go with the vehicles, including the multi-volume 1987 official Subaru service manual, 2 Chilton manuals, 1 Haynes manual and Muir’s “How to Keep Your Subaru Alive”. There are also extra parts, tires and wheels included.

You can drive one now and use the second one for parts or fix it. Both vehicles are complete (- one grille) so nearly any part needed should match and be included.

Pricetag

Price
$3,200

Location Marker

Location
Blanca, Colorado

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

See more Subarus for sale on Hemmings.com.

Editor’s note: The purpose of the “Find of the Day” is to promote interesting cars from our classifieds. These are not the actual ads, so to view more images or contact the seller with questions, click on the hyperlink (underlined green text), which will take you to the classified ad itself.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Four-Links – Airstream appeal, DPL flood, Jeep speed, Willys 99

Four-Links – Airstream appeal, DPL flood, Jeep speed, Willys 99

What exactly makes the Airstream so popular to this day? To answer that question, the National Trust for Historic Preservation spoke with Airstream restorer Matthew Hoffman about the aluminum-clad campers.

* According to the Detroit Free Press, the National Automotive History collection at the Detroit Public Library suffered slight damage last month when a sprinkler pipe burst, flooding part of the library’s Skillman branch.

* How fast can an old Jeep go? How slow can one go? Ken Bushdiecker at CJ3B.info examined those questions from just about every conceivable angle, so sit down for a deep dive on the Jeep’s capabilities, physics, and other ruminations.

* Willys was in an awkward position when, in 1933, a judge overseeing the company canceled production of the upcoming Model 99 — after the company had already printed brochures featuring the car. Mac’s Motor City Garage has more on the 99 that never was.

* This week David Conwill, Hemmings associate editor, found some footage of a Model T tour in Montana in 1981. Interesting to compare the hobby then versus now.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

The Music of Machines: There are songs about cars. But are there any real car songs?

The Music of Machines: There are songs about cars. But are there any real car songs?

Kraftwerk’s Autobahn cover. Photo of author’s copy.

Music and the automobile have always seemed to thrive together, back to the days when “In My Merry Oldsmobile” was a hit on the Tinpan Alley circuit. Cars were at the very birth of rock and roll itself, when Ike Turner and Jackie Brenston made their “Rocket 88” rhythm-and-blues track into a new form of music that has not yet seen its end. There was even one guy in the mid-’90s who recorded a folk CD entirely from within the confines of his Rambler sedan. Short of the occasional vroom vroom or honking noise for emphasis, though, cars themselves have made very little of the actual music in these so-called “car songs”—even though the average automobile is a goldmine of found sound.

And I’m not talking about the random brake squeals, tire chirps, and exhaust blat that punctuate any number of car-themed songs out there. That’s been done to death, even by groups who don’t fit the traditional “car-band” role. Have you ever listened to all seventeen minutes of Autobahn by Kraftwerk?

Machines have a rhythm: The repetitive nature of their function ensures it. Ignore the obviousness of the radio for the moment, and consider that within a single machine, the engine revs and changes pitch as the tach climbs, gears whirr and whine, exhaust notes rumble and raspberry. The whoosh of a turbocharger. The click of a lock. The metronomic tick-tock of a turn signal. Even the simplest door or hood slam can seem strangely percussive. That’s before we even venture into the horn, or the variety of tools we use to maintain and improve cars. All of these are part and parcel—the personality—of a particular car. My Dart did not sound like a Corvette, or a Mustang, or any other car, save perhaps other ’60s Mopars. It chugged along to its own rhythm. Where there’s sound, there’s music—and in an automobile, those sounds are not hard to find.

Rather than laying sound effects over a song that could otherwise get along just fine without them, the sound elements could be the song. Run all of the noises through a sampler. Build a beat using slammed car doors and trunklids. Make a melody using warning chimes and tire squeals. It’s entirely possible; technology has made it so, and arguments for electronic music not having heart, soul, meaning, depth, etc. have long ago been dismissed.

There is already a title for the sort of music I’m suggesting: “industrial.” For anyone in the ’70s who thought punk was disgraceful noise, industrial was off the charts. Combining sounds made from found objects being manipulated and smashed together—chainsaws, panes of glass, 55-gallon drums—and elements of “musique concrete,” bands like Throbbing Gristle (who actually coined the term industrial) and Einstürzende Neubauten dominated the underground scene. It was music for an increasingly mechanized society, man being replaced by machines and the decay of civilization as we knew it—and about as far away from the Beach Boys, both musically and conceptually, as you could possibly get.

Thus, we have both the musical precedent (four decades’ worth—in car terms, old enough to be “classic”), the instrument (a car), and the technological means to sample the sounds and manipulate them into a single, anthemic tune. But has anyone bothered?

Surely there is A.) room out there for real live car music to be created, and B) a way for the enthusiast to collectively clutch such a notion to his or her bosom. There have been some efforts; Top Gear’s former host James May trying to cover The Allman Brothers’ “Melissa” (the instrumental track played over the opening credits of the show) with a variety of sampled car-engine sounds. A few years ago, there was a viral MP3 of a small-displacement, multi-cylinder engine on a dyno with an electronically controlled throttle, playing a song as well (I want to say it was “Flight of the Bumblebee,” but I’m not certain).

Cars have long been the inspiration. When will they provide the instrumentation?


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1963 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1963 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder

1963 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder

From the seller’s description:

1963 Corvair Monza Spyder Convertible with Factory Air Conditioning! I know that option was not available, but someone found a unique way of solving the condenser issue by attaching a modern one to the hood and it clears the turbo. There is an auxilary one under the car out of harms way but in the full air stream. The compressor is a modern one with R134a but everything esle, especially the all important interior parts are pure 1963 Corvair. Blows very cold. As most of you know, Spyder refers to the turbocharged motor, not the convertible top. The car has also been upgraded to an alternator for better charging, and has an electric fuel pump, great for starting after long periods of rest. There is a new base/clear paint job on the car, not factory blue but a Chrysler color the previous owner preferred, looks stunning especially in the sun with the white top. When I bought the car I was told the factory turbocharged motor had been rebuilt approximately 5000 miles ago, and I have no reason to doubt it, the motor starts right up and runs very strong, or at least it does since I put a newly rebuilt carburetor on it from The Carbmeister. Other issues I discovered after delivery: backup lights had been converted to tail lights with red film, I removed the film, put in a NOS backup light switch and now backup lights work properly. Brakes had an unusually firm pedal, e-brake cable was frozen with left side applied, right side was missing equalizer bar. I sourced a bar, bought a new cable, put all new shoes, springs, and cable it, now car has proper (for era) brakes and the parking brake WORKS! Front brakes unknown, reported to me as “newer”, stops fine. Car has newer radial tires with full tread, HUGE improvement in handling over bias ply, heater fan motor is a high volume motor from Clark’s but was not functioning, bad ground, removed paint from housing, now heater motor blows hard. Convertible top has optional GLASS window and manual top works perfectly. AM radio may work, no speaker. THere had been an aftermarket stereo in the car, but the old radio was never re-wired in. Oil was leaking from the oil pan and the valve covers. Replacement of gaskets with silicone gaskets (reusable) stopped all those leaks, now just an occasional drip from somewhere, I believe from the motor/trans junction. Clutch was reported to be fairly new, super smooth with no chatter, so haven’t bothered to take it apart! Manifold temp gauge works but sometimes cuts out, must be a wiring issue because thermistor checks out OK and at times wiggling the dash harness gets gauge working. I have no desire to rewire the dash at this point. I got the car with a straight pipe exhaust, too obnoxious for me, so I installed a new header pipe from the turbo out (no easy task!) and a new turbo muffler. Sounds great now. All new parts put into this car came from Clark’s Corvair.

1963 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder 1963 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder 1963 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder 1963 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder

Pricetag

Price
$12,600

Location Marker

Location
Carmel, California

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Chevrolets for sale on Hemmings.com.

Editor’s note: The purpose of the “Find of the Day” is to highlight interesting cars from our classifieds. These are not the actual ads, so to view more images or contact the seller with questions, click on the hyperlink (underlined green text), which will take you to the classified ad itself.

 


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

The last AMC: Jeep’s ZJ Grand Cherokee turns 25

The last AMC: Jeep’s ZJ Grand Cherokee turns 25

Photos courtesy FCA Media.

Most histories depict Chrysler’s purchase of AMC as one done merely to gain the Jeep name and discard everything else, yet the former gained far more than a brand from the latter: It inherited a talented crew of engineers and designers, and it also obtained the in-development ZJ Grand Cherokee, an SUV that would end up buoying the brand past its competitors and cementing the luxury SUV’s place in the modern auto market.

Originally intended to replace the XJ Cherokee, the Grand Cherokee – then known by the XJC codename – grew out of a 1985 design competition that AMC conducted using three freelance designers: Larry Shinoda, Giorgetto Giugiaro, and Adam Clenet. According to an interview Shinoda gave to Ward’s Auto, AMC management declared his designs “terrible” and paid him less than half of a $350,000-plus contract at the same time it dispatched crews to confiscate Shinoda’s drawings and clay model templates.

Shinoda may have been forbidden to comment on the 1989 Jeep Concept I concept vehicle (which closely predicted the look of the production Grand Cherokee and thus, presumably, closely followed Shinoda’s design) due to terms of the abovementioned contract, but in January 1992, when Bob Lutz drove a production ZJ Grand Cherokee up the steps of Cobo Hall and through a plate-glass window, Shinoda began a five-year campaign to get Chrysler to own up to the theft of his design that reportedly resulted in a $200,000 settlement.

In the meantime, according to Patrick Foster’s “The Story of Jeep,” the Jeep designers and engineers who had already completed much of the work on the ZJ before the Chrysler purchase took advantage of Lee Iaccoca’s prioritization of Chrysler’s minivan redesign to refine the Grand Cherokee. The 4.0L straight-six engine, though its basic design dated back to the Sixties, benefited from an overhaul of its fuel-injection system under Chrysler ownership that brought horsepower up to 190. Also thanks to the extended development time, the ZJ would also introduce airbags in SUVs as well as pioneer the use of four-wheel antilock brakes and highway-speed four-wheel-drive systems.

It also, per Foster, boasted handling superior not only to other SUVs on the market at the time but also to many sport sedans, including the BMW 525i and Mercedes-Benz 300CE. That came in part from the four-wheel coil-spring suspension design that gave the solid-axle chassis less of a truck nature and in part from chassis tuning by UK racing industry veteran Ian Sharp.

As for the conundrum of whether the ZJ Grand Cherokee would replace the XJ Cherokee (the aging SJ Grand Wagoneer only made it through the 1991 model year) on the Toledo assembly lines, Chrysler decided to keep the latter around and build the former elsewhere. According to Foster, the company initially considered building the Grand Cherokee in Kenosha, but later decided to construct a brand-new factory, Jefferson North Assembly Plant, in Detroit.

Initially available only with the 4.0L and a four-speed automatic transmission in one of three trim levels (base, Laredo, and Limited), the ZJ Grand Cherokee later in the 1993 model year added the Chrysler-built 318-cu.in. V-8 as an option and an available five-speed manual transmission (available only with the six-cylinder).

The Grand Cherokee debuted to great success: It won a number of awards that first year, but more importantly the Jeep dealership network was able to sell as many vehicles as Jefferson North was able to produce – about 250,000 in that first extended model year, more than doubling total Jeep sales figures – and thus stave off Chrysler management’s ultimatum of introducing a Dodge-branded version of the Grand Cherokee.

Over the ZJ’s six-year model run, it more or less remained the same. The manual transmission disappeared after a couple of years, as did the base trim level, and a 5.9 Limited version in 1998 saw the 245hp version of the Dodge 360, a sort of precursor to later SRT-badged Grand Cherokees. Sales also remained strong – increasing to nearly 300,000 in 1996 – leading many of Jeep’s competitors to start offering more upscale SUVs.

Jeep went on to replace the ZJ in 1999 with the WJ, and has continued Grand Cherokee production through two more generations (WK and WK2) to today. While no formal celebrations of the Grand Cherokee’s silver anniversary have been announced, Jeep did build a 1993 ZJ – the Jeep Grand One – for its Moab lineup of concept and retro vehicles last year.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog