Hemmings Find of the Day – 1975 Datsun 280Z

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1975 Datsun 280Z

1975 Datsun 280Z

From the seller’s description:

1975 Datsun 280Z Matching numbers 2.8L Fuel injected 6 Cylinder with 4 spd manual transmission. Unmolested as built vehicle.

Original, highly maintained mechanicals. Totally rust free example from N.M. high desert. No evidence of prior rust or collision damage.

Recent premium refinish (#110 Red) of body only (to correct heavy fading) (NO rust or dent repairs) (engine bay, door surrounds, hatch surround etc. are original paint. Undercarriage is unmolested original with no evidence of rust repair or “bottom out” damage. Everything works as it should to include original Hitachi am/fm, power antenna etc. Bright metal and glass are very good. Interior is excellent to include headliner, carpeting, dash, door/side panels and seats. This spectacular example has been prepared to be driven anywhere with complete confidence having been recently treated to a major service together with 5 new Yokohama’s, muffler, battery, suspension bushings, shifter bushings, body & glass seals etc.

Head light covers (uninstalled), rear hatch louvered shades (uninstalled), car cover, owners manual / books and Clean Title in my name are included in the sale.

1975 Datsun 280Z 1975 Datsun 280Z 1975 Datsun 280Z 1975 Datsun 280Z 1975 Datsun 280Z

Pricetag

Price
$22,500

Location Marker

Location
Chatham, New Jersey

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Datsuns for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

See ya, ’17! A quick look back at some of the biggest old-car stories of the last year

See ya, ’17! A quick look back at some of the biggest old-car stories of the last year

Vespa taillamps. Photo by Hugo Cardoso.

Every day of the year we’re pounding the pavement to dig up the most informative, newsworthy, and entertaining stories from the collector-car scene, so after a year, it all becomes a little bit of a blur. Still, as we take a moment to review headlines from the year that was, several stood out for one reason or another, so let’s take some time to revisit them before we jump right on in to 2018.

1. Route 66 resuscitation in the works. The movement to preserve Route 66 in some way or another ramped up this year, prompted in part by its placement on endangered lists and in part by the pending conclusion of a funding program. To address the latter, we’ve seen a number of proposed solutions, including the Route 66 Centennial Commission Act, a proposal to recommission Route 66, and legislation aimed at making Route 66 the next National Historic Trail. Expect to see more action on the National Historic Trail designation next year.

2. Significant cars see the sun again. While this list doesn’t necessarily rank our most-read stories from the year, it does keep them in consideration, and two of our most-read stories concern long-thought-lost significant—or potentially significant—vehicles that automotive sleuths turned up. One, a 1951 VW Microbus Deluxe, sat in a German field for 50 years before a German collector determined it was the second-built Samba; it’s now under restoration. The other, a 1968 Ford Mustang, appeared in Mexico with enough clues to reportedly identify it as a car used in the filming of Steve McQueen’s Bullitt; it too is now under restoration.

3. Dune-buggy owners take on Texas ban. The roots of this story date back to 2013, but dune-buggy enthusiasts in Texas began sounding the alarm about the state’s DMV revoking titles for their dune buggies, sand rails, and kit cars earlier this year. The Texas DMV subsequently scheduled a briefing on the issue and discovered that it’s a thorny, complicated issue, one that may have national implications. A working group is expected to hammer out some solutions early next year.

4. Auto racing in Europe faces big challenges. Another story that’s been brewing for a few years concerns the EU Motor Insurance Directive and a 2014 court ruling that may cause EU residents—including those in the UK, for now—to get insurance for any motor vehicle, regardless of whether it operates on public roads. The British tabloids reliably freaked out about nan’s mobility scooter requiring insurance, but motorsports organizations also saw an existential threat in the court ruling’s implications. Both the EU and the UK concluded consultations on the issue this year, but a recent UK court ruling seems to indicate that things are as dire as European motorsports enthusiasts have warned.

5. U.K. gives classic cars an official cutoff age. Also across the Atlantic, the EU, and the UK have been figuring out exactly how to define historic cars, which is not as trivial an issue as it first sounds. A vehicle’s historic status may, for example, exempt it from city-wide old car bans, or exempt it from roadworthiness testing. And those definitions aren’t just based on a vehicle’s age, as we saw with the release of the Charter of Turin Handbook.

6. The coming of the electric collector car. Perhaps our April 1 story was more predictive than preposterous? With plenty of governments across the world setting sunset dates for the internal combustion engine and with electric vehicles capturing headlines left and right, perhaps we should expect more EV conversions of classic cars or more manufacturers to launch electric-powered replica/continuation/homage vehicles as Jaguar did this year with the E-Type Zero?

7. We go deep on ethanol, the Darien Gap, and more. One addition we made to the Hemmings Daily this year was the Sunday Hemmings In-Depth series, in which both Hemmings editors and contributors spend a little more time than normal exploring an issue. Matteo Giacon has made good use of the series to enlighten us about Italian cars while Jim Van Orden has used it to tell some tales from his youth that many can identify with. We’ve also used the series to do some mythbusting—specifically of John D. Rockefeller’s relationship with ethanol and whether Henry Ford designed the Model T as a multi-fuel car—to tally up all the various adventurers who have crossed the uncrossable Darien Gap on both two-wheels and four, and to list all the vehicles definitively lost to history.

8. Explosions of feedback. It probably shouldn’t be a surprise at all that the two Hemmings Daily articles that garnered the most comments in 2017 were Open Diff pieces—designed specifically to start conversations and get reader opinions. It’s also unsurprising, knowing our readership, that Kurt’s question about what modern carmakers just don’t understand and Joe Essid’s question about the most archetypal car song would generate the most discussion.

Speaking of feedback, we’d like to hear from you. Did this list cover it, or did we write (or not write) about a significant issue of concern to the old-car hobby not included above? And while we’re at it, let us know how we can improve over the next year.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1969 Dodge Coronet 500 convertible

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1969 Dodge Coronet 500 convertible

1969 Dodge Coronet 500 convertible

From the seller’s description:

Here is a Beautiful 1969 Dodge Coronet 500 Convertible. This car is solid top to bottom. Runs and drives excellent and sounds great also. It has the original 318 V8 engine and Automatic transmission. The paint is Very nice. All the glass is good. It has a new power convertible top. New front and rear bumpers. Interior is very nice. Door panels are original and in great shape. The seats have new covers and the rug is fairly new as well. This car is mechanically sound and will go anywhere! This car is being sold as is.

1969 Dodge Coronet 500 convertible 1969 Dodge Coronet 500 convertible 1969 Dodge Coronet 500 convertible 1969 Dodge Coronet 500 convertible

Pricetag

Price
$29,500

Location Marker

Location
Syracuse, New York

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Dodges for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Four-links – AWD GTO, RIP Yamamoto, UK collector, APB Squareback

Four-links – AWD GTO, RIP Yamamoto, UK collector, APB Squareback

Of the ways to build an all-wheel-drive mid-engine street machine, the folks behind this GTO took a rather unusual approach with a custom transmission and transfer case ahead of the engine. Engine Swap Depot has more on the car.

* Fifty years after Mazda introduced its first rotary engines, the father of the Mazda rotary, Kenichi Yamamoto, has died at the age of 95.

* Influx Magazine asked this week if Peter Frost’s assemblage of Euro bikes is the world’s most unusual motorcycle collection. It’s certainly intriguing enough.

* Ran When Parked is asking VW spotters to keep their eyes peeled for one Squareback in particular, chassis number 148 471.

* It’s a couple years old now, but this behind-the-scenes look at the vehicles of Mad Max: Fury Road is almost as good as the film itself.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Two Snaps Up: Cars, cameras, and the unrelenting march of technology

Two Snaps Up: Cars, cameras, and the unrelenting march of technology

Kodak Instamatic X-15 camera. Photos by author.

I always had a halting relationship with photography. I inherited my first camera, a Kodak that took 126 film cartridges and was manufactured circa late ’60s, because pictures weren’t being taken at home anymore. A plain-looking little box, it was black and silver, and simple in that late-’60s-sort-of-ultra-functional way. Most of the pictures from my early childhood were shot with this camera (and printed on matte paper). The plastic button on the film winder had cracked, leaving a little metal lever exposed. While I had the camera, I had no disposable income for film nor flashcubes at the tender age of eight. Matchbox cars and baseball cards were a greater priority. The camera collected dust on a shelf.

Polaroid One Step instant camera.

A couple of years later, Polaroid’s advertising blitz featuring a flirty James Garner and Mariette Hartley worked wonders on my pre-pubescent brain, and I decided that a One-Stop was something I needed to own. Pictures? Without having to go to the drugstore? Are you kidding me? WOW! Uncle Ernie had a word with Santa Claus; a couple of 10-packs of outrageously expensive film appeared alongside. The transformation of the photo, from gray matter to, well, full color, out-of-focus, badly lit matter, seemed more important to me at the time than the photography basics like composition, lighting, paying attention to what you’re shooting, and that sort of thing. I burned through the film in record time. No more was forthcoming. In short order, the One-Stop was on a shelf, high up in the linen closet. It disappeared at a garage sale.

Konica SLR camera body.

Dad stepped up to a 35-mm Konica in the late ’70s, and took some lovely portraits—a horse standing stoically outside a barn on a misty spring morning somewhere deep in Monmouth County, New Jersey, I recall being particularly lovely. Otherwise it was chronically underused when new hobbies came on line.

Kodak disc camera.

A few cameraless years passed, and then one Christmas I was blindsided by the arrival of a Kodak Disc camera. Remember the Kodak Disc? It was the size of a pack of smokes, and had 15 teeny negatives on a carousel. Wheat bread has less grain in it than the resulting photos did. Nonetheless, it recorded the few pleasant moments of my teen years—most of them having to do with lighting model cars on fire in the woods. All of my remaining negatives are kept in a Space: 1999 lunchbox, with a handlebar moustache drawn on Martin Landau, in a corner of my office. As often happens with proprietary technology (think Betamax, Digital Audio Tape, and Laserdisc), the format died, and the film disappeared. Can the drugstore even make prints from a Disc negative anymore?

There were common threads: I had no money for film, the appeal wore off quickly, none of them took pictures worth a damn, and the ability to continue using them would have been scuttled by the changing technology anyway. Plus, the operator wasn’t doing things any favors, either.

So, imagine my surprise when I actually became an automotive writer in 1993, had a camera shoved in my hand, and was told “go shoot something.” I walked off with my dad’s ancient Konica, unused for years and donated for the cause of his only child retaining gainful employment. I promptly sent it packing in favor of a Nikon 35-mm body and a small selection of lenses I could barely afford. On-the-job photo training worked more or less like this:

  1. An editor would tell me to go photograph something.
  2. I’d get the slides back.
  3. Coworkers would congregate around the light table with a loupe for an hour. Much laughter ensued. From them, not me.
  4. Back to #1.

Improvement was gradual. Futures on the silver market jumped 15 cents every time I loaded up my bag with Fujichrome.

They say practice makes perfect, but nearly a quarter-century on, and I’m still practicing every time I’m out on a shoot. I haven’t yet seen perfect. Some things I thought were sure-fire photos have flopped miserably. Images I shot as last-minute afterthoughts have showed up on magazine covers. I’ve stopped trying to reason it out. Still, I’ve gotten to a point where editors seem to want my pictures more than they want my words—a weird feeling for someone who’s always considered himself a writer first.

1970 Chevelle SS 454 LS6

1970 Chevelle SS 454 LS6.

I made the conversion to digital SLRs in 2003, using a succession of Canon DSLRs, starting with a 10D. (In a not-uncommon move considering my history, the 10D is no longer made, although the lenses, battery packs, and memory cards are universal enough.) The cost of the equipment—camera, CD burner, media—pales in comparison to the savings. I run a pair of 50Ds now—not new cameras by any means, but they’re everything I need to do my job.

Though I do wonder: At what point will technology make the next big leap—again—and everything I own will be obsolete? Will JPEGS really be the default format for the next 50 years? Will CDs and DVDs be able to hold more—or better still, will CDs and DVDs be replaced by something more efficient? Now that I’ve invested in the technology, I expect it to change any minute now. When will phones be able to give SLR-quality photos? Should be momentarily.

1987 Buick GNX

1987 Buick GNX.

It’s kind of like cars, really: from carburetors to mechanical fuel injection to electronic fuel injection; from bias-ply to radial to low-profile all-weather 35-series big-inch rubber; from rear-drive to front-drive to (occasionally) all-wheel-drive and back to rear again, this time with traction control; from drum brakes to disc to four-wheel antilock sensors. For years, the SS 454 Chevelle, or else something with a Hemi, was an unsurpassable pinnacle; just 15 years later, and with two fewer cylinders and roughly half the displacement, a Buick was able to meet or beat those cars’ acceleration numbers in a quarter-mile. Another 15 beyond that and there are econoboxes that can be specced out to give muscle cars a run for their money. New Honda Accords offer performance that ’70s Porsches would have killed for. Meantime at the top end, sedans and sports cars alike have 600 hp under foot. An 840-horsepower car is in production. What will I use to photograph the next wave of hot cars?


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1975 Barris Snakepit

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1975 Barris Snakepit

Ostensible land-speed contender 1975 George Barris Snakepit for sale on Hemmings.com. From the seller’s description:

This extreme example of the Californian customisers’ craft and ingenuity was created in the early 1970s, and took four years to complete. The gospel according to its promoters is that it was built to attack international speed records “at speeds that stagger the imagination”.

It was hand-built by a team led by George Barris and assisted by Harry Bradley, Joe Bailon and Jay Ohrberg. They were employed in this project by California Show Cars.

Serious aerodynamic considerations were applied to the vehicle’s all-steel streamlined body while its external skin panels were completely hand-crafted to a painstaking design. After the finishing touches were applied, the experts at Barris were given the task of applying 30 coats of hand rubbed lacquer, an orange finish over an initial pearl-white base coat.

The 300mph target speed of this 23-feet-long streamliner was to have been achieved through Barris’s use of six Cobra-Ford V8 engines, each displacing 351 cubic inches to deliver a total of 2,000 horsepower. Consequently, ‘Snakepit’s capacious engine room provides a successful no-reserve bidder with what has been described as “…96 valves to be synchronized, 48 spark plugs firing in unison, 12 Holley four-barrel carburetors, six Cragar transistorized distributors and 48 chromed exhaust pipes”, plus “…two Ford C-6 automatic transmissions and a pair of Pontiac rear ends”.

Furthermore, its promoters went on to describe how ‘Snakepit’ was to be “…controlled by the pilot using two Moon gas pedals, feeding fuel carried aboard in MOON aluminum tanks; a custom steering wheel and a Hurst dual pattern shifter. The driver is comfortably surrounded in an orange velvet interior. The engines, which have been super tuned to perfection, include among their specialty equipment, MOON racing camshafts, dual quad manifolds and valve covers by Edelbrock, and a variety of Ford and Autolite high performance gear”.

When ‘Snakepit’ was launched to an incredulous public in the 1970s it was valued at a claimed $100,000. This extraordinary feet of engineering has formed part of a private collection for the last ten years. It has not run in this time and is sold as viewed.

Pricetag

Price
$750,000

Location Marker

Location
Palm Springs , California

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

See more cars for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Tucker club merges with AACA Museum; “Clubs are not what they used to be”

Tucker club merges with AACA Museum; “Clubs are not what they used to be”

Tucker gallery at the AACA Museum. Photos by the author, unless otherwise noted.

With just a fraction of its peak membership and dwindling engagement, The Tucker Automobile Club of America has reached an existential moment; the official partnership it announced this week with the AACA Museum proposes not only to save the club but also to serve as a prototype for other car clubs nearing their own ends.

“The Tucker club was founded to do a few specific things, which I believe they’ve accomplished, and has since invented things to do to remain relevant,” said Eric Breslow, president of the club. “So the club as a standalone 501(c)3 will end, but as an entity it won’t.”

According to Breslow, club membership is well down from its peak of around 600 shortly after the release of the 1988 film “Tucker: The Man and His Dream.” And with fewer members comes fewer resources. As he pointed out in a Facebook post to club members earlier this year soliciting feedback about the then-proposed partnership:

The TACA depends on the work of its dedicated volunteers, who coordinate membership, produce the Tucker Topics newsletter and plan our conventions. While they do great work, they face many challenges and our club is not able to provide them with much in the way of infrastructure or back-of-house support.

The sad reality is that in this technology-driven environment, the costs of operating our club outnumber the proceeds we bring in from our membership dues.

With the goals set out by club founders David Cammack and Richard Jones – tracking down all of the Tucker cars, documenting the complete history of Tucker, and ensuring the Tucker legacy in large part through the film – completed, Breslow said he had no intention of seeing the club go bankrupt once he took over as president last year.

“The stories have been told and retold,” he said. “The club would come to its end eventually unless something bold happened.”

For that reason, he began a search for a partner that would help keep the club going. While the AACA Museum in Hershey, Pennsylvania, was one of multiple entities the club’s board of directors explored partnerships with, Breslow said it made the most sense to partner with the museum, largely because it already hosted the world’s largest collection of Tuckers and Tucker memorabilia.

“The history of Tucker was with David Cammack,” Breslow said. “We have a nice archive, but Dave had the complete history, he really had the keys to the kingdom of Tucker. And with his collection now at the AACA Museum, if the club were to go on separately, it’d be like having a body buried in one place and the headstone somewhere else.”

In the press release announcing the merger, Breslow noted that the partnership “gives the TACA a much larger, long-term platform to accurately share one of the greatest stories in automotive history.”

Over a series of conversations dating back to last fall, the boards of directors for both the Tucker club and the museum have hammered out the terms of the partnership. According to Jeff Bliemeister, executive director for the AACA Museum, the museum will essentially absorb the club, serve as its headquarters, and assist with publication of the club’s newsletter and with organization of club activities. The partnership also includes installing a club representative on the museum’s board and forming a working committee within the museum dedicated to everything Tucker related.

Photo by Stan Sipko.

“They will still have some autonomy; in a way, we already do something similar with the bus museum,” Bliemeister said. “Essentially, we’ll carry on their tradition and help further their goals.”

In exchange, the club will combine its archives and memorabilia with the Cammack collection and throw its support behind the museum.

“It’s a big relaunch of the club for us,” Breslow said. “It gives the club long-term direction.”

Breslow and Bliemeister said their respective boards both see the partnership as a natural fit.

Bliemeister also said he and other museum officials would like to form similar partnerships with other car clubs as they find themselves in similar positions to the Tucker club.

“The possibility is there; we’re open to any kind of partnership moving forward,” he said. “Standalone clubs are dying, so we as a public museum want to do whatever we can to help out the hobby as a whole. And for us to house other marque clubs, that’s how we’re going to grow as a museum.”

Breslow echoed Bliemeister’s assessment of the car club scene as a whole. “In my opinion, the car club model of the Seventies is dead and not coming back,” he said. “Clubs are not what they used to be. The next generation is not interested in joining old-school car clubs.”

The partnership will take effect January 1.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion wins FIA Founding Members Heritage Cup

Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion wins FIA Founding Members Heritage Cup

Sports cars head towards the Andretti Hairpin during the 2014 Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion. Photo by author.

Since 2010, the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) has presented the Founding Members Cup, generally to an event of great significance to historic motoring, at its annual year-end gala. In 2017, the award was presented to the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion, marking the first time it’s honored an event held on U.S. soil.

A beloved part of the annual “Car Week” on California’s Monterey Peninsula, the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion features historic racing cars and renowned drivers from across the globe, competing in a variety of classes that include everything from sports cars to F1 cars, Can-Am cars, and GTP cars. Representing decades that stretch from the prewar years to the early 1990s, the event offers on-track action for almost every racing fan, while the paddock is transformed into a living history museum that allows fans to see their favorite cars – and sometimes, their favorite drivers – up close.

The Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion was nominated by Nick Craw, an accomplished racer, the former president of the SCCA, and current president of the FIA’s senate. Previous Heritage Cup award-winning events include the London-to-Brighton Veteran Car Run (2010), the reborn Mille Miglia (2012), the AvD Oldtimer Grand Prix (2014), the Royal Automobile Club 1000 Mile Trial (2015), and the Targa Florio (2016). Non-event winners have included The Louwman Museum in 2011, and author Martin Pfudner in 2013.

Gill Campbell accepts the award from Jean Todt (L) and Nick Craw (R). Photo by Jean-Marie Hervio, courtesy Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca.

Of the award, Sports Car Racing Association of the Monterey Peninsula (SCRAMP) representative Gill Campbell said,

To have 28 international FIA representatives (one from each country) vote and recognize SCRAMP for such an honor is testament to the passion and professionalism of SCRAMP staff, volunteers, sponsors and the County of Monterey. It is through the dedication and enthusiasm from each participant who shares his or her cars on the track and in the paddock that makes the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion so special internationally. Recognition from international peers is humbling, and to receive such an honor in our 60th anniversary year and before more than 800 of the world’s motorsports elite in attendance will never be forgotten.

In 2017, the Rolex Monterey Motorsport Reunion celebrated the 60th anniversary of Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, instead of honoring a particular marque of automobile as in years past. This year’s event drew over 500 cars, participating in 15 run groups across four days of racing. In addition, the Racing Through the Decades paddock display featured a dozen cars and motorcycles with significant ties to Laguna Seca, including the Ferrari 500 Testa Rossa driven by Pete Lovely to victory in the track’s very first race.

The 2018 Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion will take place from August 23-26, 2018. For additional information, or to purchase tickets, visit MazdaRaceway.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Selling performance, with a side of exclusivity

Selling performance, with a side of exclusivity

1970 Buick GSX

1970 Buick GSX print ad, courtesy of the Automotive History Preservation Society.

By all accounts, the 1970 Buick Gran Sport 455 was the then-ultimate muscle car from GM’s most conservative brand, powered by a 350 horsepower, 455-cu.in. V-8 capable of running the quarter-mile in under 14 seconds. Its understated exterior wasn’t to everyone’s liking, but the GSX package – introduced mid-year – changed that, serving up a both a bold appearance and limited-production exclusivity.

Adding $1,196 to the price of the GS 455, the 1970 GSX model included a hood-mounted tachometer; a Rallye steering wheel; black bucket seats; a front air dam and rear spoiler; sport mirrors; power front disc brakes; G60-15 tires on chrome-plated 15×7-inch wheels; a four-speed manual transmission; a 3.42:1 rear axle ratio with a Positive Traction differential; a Rallye Ride Control Package (including a special front stabilizer bar; rear stabilizer bar; rear control arms and bushings; rear Firm Ride springs; and front and rear Firm Ride Tuned shocks); and GSX badging on the instrument panel and grille. Two colors – Saturn Yellow and Apollo White – were offered, and graphic treatments included a side stripe and a black-panel hood.

In case the standard V-8 – rated at 350 horsepower and 510 pound-feet of torque –  wasn’t exciting enough, the optional V-8 included in the Stage I package upped output to 360 horsepower, courtesy of a high-lift camshaft, a different four-barrel carburetor, heavy-duty valve springs, functional hood scoops, heavy-duty cooling and a low-restriction dual-exhaust system. Despite the changes, the Stage 1’s torque rating remained the same, though the extra horsepower was enough for most GSX buyers to select the option.

As one would expect from Buick, a range of luxury accessories was also available, including a Turbo Hydramatic 400 automatic transmission, a stereo tape player, air conditioning, a speed alert, Soft-Ray tinted windows, a power-adjustable driver’s seat, power windows, power locks, cruise control (with the automatic transmission only), and a tilt steering wheel.

Buick built 8,732 Gran Sport 455 two-door hardtops and another 1,416 GS 455 convertibles for 1970, but true to its word, just 678 GSX models, all in the two-door hardtop body style. The GSX carried over into 1971 and 1972, when it became an appearance package available on any Gran Sport model. For 1973, the Gran Sport name was adopted by Buick’s new “Colonnade” A-bodies, and the GSX moniker took a year off. It returned in 1974, but oddly as a trim package on the Apollo instead of the GS.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog