Owner, crew chief, and NASCAR Hall of Fame inductee Bud Moore dead at age 92

Owner, crew chief, and NASCAR Hall of Fame inductee Bud Moore dead at age 92

Bud Moore

Bud Moore at the Motor Trend 500, 1967. Images courtesy Ford Motorsports.

Legendary crew chief, team owner, and 2011 inductee into the NASCAR Hall of Fame Walter Maynard “Bud” Moore Jr. has died. Moore, from Spartanburg, South Carolina, was a decorated World War II veteran who served in the 90th Infantry Division and landed on Utah Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944. He later served with General George W. S. Patton in the 3rd Army during their push across Europe. He was wounded five times during battle and received five Purple Hearts and two Bronze Stars, including one with Oak Leaf clusters for his heroism.

Bud joined NASCAR as a crew chief for Buck Baker in 1957 and won a championship in that role in 1958. He later formed his own race team and won two NASCAR titles as a team owner with Joe Weatherly in 1962 and 1963, winning eight and 12 races, respectively, during those seasons. Weatherly might well have repeated a championship again in 1964, had he not been killed during a race at California’s Riverside International Speedway early that year. A third owner’s championship again barely escaped him with driver Bobby Allison finishing second in the standings in 1978.

Bobby Allison racing the #15 Bud Moore Ford Thunderbird against the #27 Chevy Monte Carlo of Benny Parsons at Daytona in 1980. Photo from Daytona Racing Archives, courtesy Ford Motorsports.

The Bud Moore Racing team fielded a who’s who of legendary NASCAR drivers during its tenure including Weatherly, Ricky Rudd, Dale Earnhardt Sr., Buddy Baker, Lake Speed, Benny Parsons, Geoff Bodine, and Allison; the latter driver winning the Daytona 500 for Bud Moore Racing in 1978. The team’s final series win was at Sonoma in 1993.

Moore was part of the second class of NASCAR Hall of Fame inductees in 2011, which also included Allison, Ned Jarrett, David Pearson, and Lee Petty. During his induction ceremony Moore was asked how he would like to be remembered after his passing. He responded:

One who made many contributions to building the sport, one whose handshake was as good as any contract, who always gave a straight answer and would never sugar-coat it, either. Most of all, to be remembered as a man who loves his family, his country, and the sport of racing.

Moore was predeceased by his wife of 64 years, Betty Clark Moore, three brothers, and two sisters. He is survived by three sons, three brothers, and one sister, as well as five grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and three great-great grandchildren.

Outside the Bud Moore Engineering shop in Spartanburg, South Carolina in 1966. That’s Parnelli Jones in the sport coat, Dan Gurney clutching the helmet and Bud Moore on the far right.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that a donation be made in Bud Moore’s name to Victory Junction, Wounded Warrior Project, and/or the Hearing Charities of America Hearing Aid Project.

He will be remembered as a member of our “Greatest Generation” as well as a legendary NASCAR contributor who helped elevate the sport to the status it enjoys today.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

The Class of ’25, Part Three: Meet Tilly

The Class of ’25, Part Three: Meet Tilly

Santa brought the writer a 1923 Ford touring car body, which has been dubbed “Tilly,” thanks to the original plan to use a pair of Tillotson down-draft carburetors on the engine. The Tillotsons are no longer in the picture, but the name stuck. Image by Clayton Paddison.

As you can see above, shortly after my last update, a major milestone was hit. After no doubt growing weary from my constant hand-wringing about ever finding a body to use, my clubmates surprised me yet again by digging up a touring car for my “Class of ’25” project. The sharp-eyed will note that the body isn’t a 1925, though, it’s a 1923—the only year in the United States that Ford married the low radiator introduced in 1917 with the one-man top and slanted windshield that characterized 1923-’25 production.

The writer has a weakness for period aftermarket parts, including a NOS Peerless honeycomb radiator and corresponding shell. Photo by Clayton Paddison.

Starting with a 1923 body is no problem, as the 1925 frame (once the base of a sandblasting table) and engine don’t care and will bolt up just the same. It also allows me to use a period aftermarket Peerless honeycomb radiator (said to be NOS left over from 1928) and shell. The biggest change, however, is likely not the switch to the 1923 body, but the decision to use fenders and running boards.

Compare the current vision with the earlier version—fenders, hood, and top will all lend a more civilized air to Tilly. Art by Clayton Paddison.

My visit to Monterey, California, this summer for Monterey Car Week, gave me considerably more exposure to Full Classics than I’m used to. One car in particular, a Cadillac-bodied Duesenberg Model A, struck my fancy and made me realize that perhaps I was being a bit narrow-minded when it came to my insistence on running fenderless. At the very least, fenders are another place to store things for longer trips, and they’re undeniably classy.

The 1923 Duesenberg Model A Sport Phaeton at RM Sotheby’s Monterey auction that kicked off this change of direction. Photo by Darin Schnabel, courtesy RM Sotheby’s.

When I started telling people about the switch to fenders, some were incredulous (namely my fellow Barnstormers) and some (namely my wife) were thrilled. As I’ve revised my plan and started showing people examples of the look I’m after, which is heavily influenced by the roadsters of Vernon “Gabby” Garrison and Bob Estes, everyone has come around to appreciate the potential. My buddy Clayton is particularly approving of the increased use of nickel plating that will come along with the fuller bodywork.

NOS “one-man” top spotted at Hershey and begging to be adapted to Tilly. More period aftermarket goodness. Image by the author.

Along with the fenders will come a top and side curtains. I spotted an NOS aftermarket top assembly at Hershey and got contact information from the seller. I’m a sucker for period aftermarket stuff, even if it’s not a speed part. Better yet, the tan top material is a dead ringer for the top and side curtains I’ve been envisioning. I also popped into the LeBaron Bonney tent at Hershey and started trying to sweet talk them into producing me an upholstery kit for a T that resembles the brown leatherette in a 1928 Ford Model A.

The 1917 to ’25 Ford headlamp is a bulb-and-reflector unit that often suffers from decayed silvering on the reflector and a filament orientation that is rotated 90 degrees from the original design. Image by the author.

So far, this has been much talk and little progress, unfortunately. But that should change soon. I’ve got a pair of well-used headlamps in my possession now, and I want to start on what will hopefully be the first of many “Gow-To” articles you will see here. The bulb-and-reflector technology of the 1920s and ’30s isn’t quite on par with modern headlamps and, worse yet, 70 years of sealed-beam use has actually eroded some of the quality that did exist before 1940.

I’m planning to restore one of these headlamps to something approximating period technology and then see if re-silvering the reflector or replacing it with polished aluminum, along with adapting a modern halogen bulb, makes a significant difference in the quality of illumination. Stay tuned!


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1951 Henry J Deluxe

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1951 Henry J Deluxe

Restored 1951 Henry J Deluxe for sale on Hemmings.com. From the seller’s description:

Reaction to this 1951 Henry J Deluxe Coupe is usually curiosity and delight, given its unique appearance and styling. If Stan Lee, the iconic comic book illustrator and author were to select a model to represent in any of his comics, the Henry J is wonderful example. The Henry J’s are unquestionably cute and fun, representing a retro early 1950’s design, with its spaceship hood ornament, raked body,and subtle tail fins.

Powered by a 161cubic inch/2.8 liter L-Head “Supersonic” six cylinder engine, coupled to a three speed “on the tree” overdrive transmission, followed downstream by a live axle 4:10 ratio differential, it starts immediately with the push of a button, shifts and runs smoothly. A little bit of solid lifter noise is evident but very acceptable, and there is no smoke from the newly updated complete top of the line exhaust system with a stainless steel muffer and all new pipes from the exhaust manifold back. Its overdrive actuation is recently intermittant which I am chasing and have ordered a kickdown switch to hopefully correct. The Henry J’s transmission shift smoothly and quitely with no unusual noises and smooth synchros in second and third gear. First gear is not synchonized.

Restored in 2011, its body and sheet metal, frame, and suspension are very solid and original with the exception of custom replacement Henry J front right and left outer floor pans as well as new Henry J rocker panels just below the right and left doors only. The correct fit custom panels were installed. Dynamat rubber/foil insulation has been installed beneath the insulated carpeting. Its paint, a two stage red,base coat/clear coat is showing its age in some places with some minor chipping, however it is in nice condition overall. The chrome front and rear bumper have some very minor random pitting as does the center grill assembly.

The Henry J’s interior upholstery is in very nice condition and certainly unique with its “Dragon” (looks like alligator) trim. The complete front seat has been nicely re-upholstered recently maintaing much of its originality. Custom carpeting is in excellent condition. The rear seat assembly is original and in very nice condition, as is the headliner,and door panels. Glass is in excellent conditon with the exception of the drivers door glass which has one crack. The windows function very nicely in their channels.

Recent servicing entailed six new Champion H11 spark plugs, a brand new complete exhaust system, all oils replaced, ie engine, (10/40 Pennzoil w/ZDDP additive) transmission, and differential, new alternator belt, complete chassis lubrication, anti-freeze flush and replace(correct green), new fuel filter, and wheel bearing repack. The tires are older fifteen inch wide bias ply whitewalls which have excellent tread. For better handling and touring, replacing them with radials will provide for a better ride.

All electricals function nicely, now converted to 12 volts with an alternator. The speedometer/odometer function nicely and are very correct. All the lights work perfectly inclusive of dash lights, headlamps, and tail and turn signal lamps.

In conclusion, this is a very fun car to own and drive. It’s not a concourse restoration, but of a very nice and respectable driver quality restoration. When on the road, it certainly garners a lot of attention and “thumbs up”, and is not hard to miss in its color scheme. Very fun.

Pricetag

Price
$8,650

Location Marker

Location
Belchertown, Massachusetts

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

See more Kaisers for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

The first Funny Car – Dick Landy’s Dodge Hemi Coronet heads to auction in Florida

The first Funny Car – Dick Landy’s Dodge Hemi Coronet heads to auction in Florida

1965 Dodge Hemi Coronet AFX

Dick Landy’s 1965 Dodge Hemi Coronet AFX Dragster. Photos courtesy Mecum Auctions.

The 12 B-bodies rolled out by Chrysler in late 1964 for Factory Experimental drag racing didn’t look quite right, especially in profile. Out back, a massive overhang was created by moving the rear wheels forward 15 inches, while up front, the tires – moved 10 inches in the same direction – nearly scraped the bumper. “Funny Cars,” the fans called them, and soon a new racing class was born. In January, the altered-wheelbase 1965 Hemi-powered Dodge Coronet originally shipped to Dick Landy and believed to be the first of the modified “funny cars” raced heads to auction, part of Mecum’s sale in Kissimmee, Florida.

1965 Dodge Hemi Coronet AFX

For the program, Chrysler supplied six Dodge Coronets and six Plymouth Furys Satellites, each (except for a single Plymouth “test mule”) issued to a Mopar-sponsored racer. Bodies in white were shipped from Chrysler’s Los Angeles assembly plant to a third-party contractor for “chemical milling,” an alternative description of the acid-dipping process that shaved 200 pounds of weight (but occasionally made strength and rigidity an issue).

1965 Dodge Hemi Coronet AFX

Next, the lightened bodies were sent to Amblewagon in Troy, Michigan, for wheelbase alteration, before being fitted with Plexiglas windows, lightened door hinges, and fiberglass components that included doors, deck lid, hood, front bumper, and dashboard. Once assembled, the cars weighed in at just 2,800 pounds, or 400 pounds below the NHRA’s minimum for the A/FX class. Even this was (more or less) by design: teams would have to add ballast to make weight, but were allowed to position it for maximum traction at launch.

1965 Dodge Hemi Coronet AFX

Originally, the AFX Dragsters carried carburetors atop their 426 Hemis, but fuel injection was added in early 1965.

As part of the package, Chrysler shipped its sponsored drivers receiving “AFX Dragster” cars a spare Hemi engine and transmission, either a four-speed manual or beefed-up TorqueFlite automatic. Most made subtle changes to the cars to gain whatever minute advantage they could; Landy, for example, added a suspension brace of his own design.

1965 Dodge Hemi Coronet AFX

It didn’t take the NHRA long to ban these altered wheelbase “Funny Cars,” though the more lenient AHRA permitted the cars to run in the Super Stock class. Match race competition was the most lucrative, and fans soon grew to love the showy, wheel-standing runs put on by the altered-wheelbase cars, prompting Landy to etch “This Side Up” on the bottom of his Hemi Coronet. Chrysler, on the other hand, was less amused by wheelies, proclaiming that these lightened cars were not built to endure such punishment. Racing is all about winning, and when teams realized that the nose-high runs were costing victories, wheelie bars and changes to setup shifted focus from show to go.

1965 Dodge Hemi Coronet AFX

Landy is believed to be the first to race his altered-wheelbase Mopar, and, if so, it would make this example the first “Funny Car.” In the spring of 1965, Chrysler supplied fuel injection to its AFX Dragster teams, and the Landy Dodge today carries the same livery and setup it did in May 1965, shortly before Landy embarked on a national tour.

1965 Dodge Hemi Coronet AFX

Wheelie bars later replaced the minimalist rollers pictured here.

Verifying the authenticity of a car like this can be challenging, but, in the case of the Landy Dodge, it has passed through a relatively small number of owners, who seemingly understood the factory race car’s place in history. In the 1990s, it was Dick Landy himself who reviewed the car and verified its authenticity, citing the alterations made for his suspension brace, the “This Side Up” etching, and a cracked driver-side taillamp–a detail that few aside from Landy would have knowledge of–as proof that this was indeed the car issued by Chrysler. The Hemi Coronet also comes complete with a copy of the original MSO, signed by Landy, a binder of Chrysler internal paperwork on the car, and a Chrysler Registry Report proclaiming it “the best Altered-AFX example of its kind.”

1965 Dodge Hemi Coronet AFX

The Dick Landy Dodge is one of the offerings from the Nick Smith Factory Lightweights Collection, a group that also includes a pair of Gas Ronda’s Mustangs, a 1964 Ford Thunderbolt raced by Bob Martin, a 1963 Chevrolet Impala Z11, and a 1965 Ford Galaxie 500 Lightweight raced by Jack Shick.

The upcoming Kissimmee, Florida, sale takes place from January 5-14, 2018, at the Osceola Heritage Park. For additional details, visit Mecum.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Mitsubishi’s “Re-Model A” pays homage to the brand’s first automobile

Mitsubishi’s “Re-Model A” pays homage to the brand’s first automobile

Mitsubishi Re-Model A

Mitsubishi’s Re-Model A, built by West Coast Customs. Photos courtesy Mitsubishi Motors.

In 1917, the Mitsubishi Shipbuilding Company of Kobe, Japan, introduced its first automobile, the Model A limousine, based upon Fiat’s Tipo 3. A century later, Mitsubishi is still building vehicles, and to commemorate its centennial, the Japanese automaker partnered with West Coast Customs to create the “Re-Model A,” a restomod that blends Model A styling with the latest Outlander plug-in hybrid crossover.

1917 Mitsubishi Model A

A 1917 Mitsubishi Model A.

From the beginning, both Mitsubishi and West Coast Customs wanted to do more than drop a Model A body onto an Outlander chassis. While the California customizer attempted to retain as much of the Model A as possible, the goal was to include as many of the Outlander’s contemporary features – including the Super All-Wheel Control all-wheel-drive system, plug-in hybrid drivetrain, forward collision mitigation, and even smartphone integration – as possible. The result is something that looks neither contemporary nor old, but, perhaps, more like a Tom Daniel design from the 1960s, minus the exposed engine and sidepipes.

Mitsubishi Re-Model A

Fitting the hybrid powertrain beneath the hood required extensive modification and reshaping, and the wheelbase was clearly lengthened to accommodate the Outlander’s all-wheel-drive system. Following teardown, the body was strengthened to retain its shape after being stretched in both length and width. Whether or not the design works is a matter of opinion, but some touches, like the motorcycle-tire sidemount and fake external brake and shift levers, simply leave us scratching our heads.

Mitsubishi Re-Model A

Fortunately, the build did not require the sacrifice of an original Mitsubishi Model A. As Daniel Strohl wrote in his coverage of Mitsubishi’s centennial, just 22 Model A limousines were constructed between 1917 and 1920, and, of these, none survive today. Though the donor car is referred to as a Model A in numerous build photos, it is a postwar copy of the prewar original.

Mitsubishi Re-Model A

Francine Harsini, senior director of marketing for Mitsubishi Motors North America, said of the Re-Model A,

The team at West Coast Customs seamlessly blended our past, present, and future together in the form of the Mitsubishi Re-Model A. It’s been an invigorating and exciting project to be a part of and we are excited to share the finished product with everyone. Additionally, this unique build provided us the opportunity to use product integration to highlight Mitsubishi’s all-new Outlander PHEV, which comes to market later this year.

Mitsubishi Re-Model A

The Mitsubishi Re-Model A debuted on an episode of Inside West Coast Customs, and will be making its first public appearance at the Los Angeles Auto Show, which runs from December 1-10 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Expect to see it at other major auto shows across the United States in the months that follow.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

The Giving Nissan: Sometimes, the ones we love are the ones that have to go

The Giving Nissan: Sometimes, the ones we love are the ones that have to go

1992 Nissan NX Coupe

1992 Nissan NX Coupe, sold here as the NX2000. Photos courtesy Nissan Corporation.

When I moved back to civilization after two hateful and poorly spent years in South Bend, Indiana, I left a piece of me behind: a little white chunk of steel, quietly rusting to pieces with dignity. The one that got away still haunts me.

That was my first new car—a ’92 Nissan NX2000, the little-seen replacement for the Pulsar. SR20DE twin-cam Four, T-tops, five-speed, 7500-rpm redline, grrr. It had gone 203,000 miles in 11 years with me, and certainly still had more in it. Beyond being a car, it meant so much to me. It was a car that never sold very well, and as a result I’d never see another on the road—a small way of asserting my individuality. (Hey, it wasn’t The Prisoner’s Lotus Seven, but it did the trick.) It meant that I was out of the hellish confines of a Midwestern university and making my way in the world. It was the only tangible asset I had that could be traced back to my recently departed grandfather, whose house was sold upon his passing and that paid for that machine in whole. It saw me through my rise from New Jersey Monthly wage slave, to low-level car-magazine grunt, to staff writer for a better-known and more widely circulated automotive magazine, to an ill-advised career change making toys. It was a subject of mockery at car-magazine staffs on both coasts. We saw at least 26 of the lower 48 states together. It pre-dated my wife. We were inseparable. We were running buddies. It was there for me when nothing, and no one, else seemed to be.

Poor thing was a mess. It deserved better. The front spoiler had bit it in a snowbank years ago. Someone in a Jeep got too close in a parking lot and ripped the rear bumper clean off; it was patched with spit and bailing wire since the repair estimates came within three dollars of an insurance deductible I didn’t have. It had been through a pair of five-speed transaxles, including a hard-to-find close-ratio ’box; both suffered from fifth-gear popout, a design fault in that particular trans. Cruising at 80 in Fourth not only kills the gas mileage, but it really makes things loud, too. It was stolen in the late ’90s to nab the 17-inch Enkei Wungun wheels I had recently acquired; the tow company, discovering it downtown on cinderblocks, pulled it onto the flatbed, knocking the front subframe out of true, puncturing the radiator, and wrinking both front fenders. Then, they charged me $500 to get it out of their storage yard. Somehow, I was happy to do it. I replaced the struts at 150,000 miles; the fronts were so worn that the strut shaft would retract into the body of the strut simply by holding it upside-down.

It left LA with us when we returned to the Midwest. When it turned 200,000 miles, sometime within those two years, my wife was behind the wheel. I knew the milestone was approaching, but hadn’t been in it for a couple of weeks. Next time I hopped in, it showed 200,300 or so on it. I missed the turnover. You could have shot me and not gotten a worse reaction. Why hadn’t I been informed of this milestone? I stewed silently for days.

In 2003, the move back to California was already in motion, and spending a grand to transport a $500 car across the country was too much for my wallet and my common sense, no matter how loudly my heart tried to intervene. A for-sale message was posted on a marque-specific web forum, and a deal was struck.

1992 Nissan NX Coupe

I cruised to meet the buyer at 80 mph in Fourth, an even 4000 rpm, the 300 or so miles there. We met in an Ohio hotel parking lot just off the Turnpike, halfway for both of us: the kid (barely 21) had cash, and my wife followed me in the new daily driver. We took our time going home, and I was inconsolable, alternately stony silence and making a blubbering mess of myself in an Applebee’s near the state line. Tears, snot in my moustache, the whole nine yards.

Dispensing with that particular car felt like I was in effect closing the book on large chunks of my life—pieces I didn’t necessarily want to leave behind. Memories, stories, dead relatives, the successful exodus of my unhappy college years, all embodied in one little white hatchback. My head and my bank account still tell me that it was the right move. My heart? It’s been nearly 15 years since I left. The heartache is more of a cramp after all this time.

Imagine my surprise when I got home and played the answering machine message: the new owner had blown it up 10 miles from where the deal was done, that it was on the side of the road, and what was I going to do about it? He claimed the crankcase had no oil, which I found hard to believe since I’d just driven it more than three hours to meet him. I suspect he over-revved it, shifting at or beyond redline in his zeal for a new toy. A 203,000-mile toy. No finesse. Kaboom. I broke a pop-up Perfection game board the Christmas that I was 8, with much the same enthusiasm, so I recognize the symptoms.

A day later, I receive a call from a member of the Ohio Highway Patrol asking, “When are you going to take your car off my road?” Noting his pointlessly snide tone, I matched him, telling him I didn’t much care, since it wasn’t my car anymore.

But that was a lie. I did care. I wanted to send it to a good home, and I failed. All I’m thinking is, this is a message. It’s being a brat, Herbie the Love Bug style, and is making its intentions known: it wants to be with the only owner it’s ever known, the only one who’s ever cared about it. It wants to be here, with me. And I wanted it, too.

We heard that the new owner beat the Highway Patrol in a race to retrieve it, and then…silence. It turns out that the $600 we made on it paid exactly for the gas that powered the 28-foot U-Haul (with car trailer) from South Bend to Los Angeles. It let itself get wrecked in the hands of some clueless punk in order to get my wife and me away from the horrors of the Midwest, and home to a place where we only knew happiness.

I am reminded of Shel Silverstein’s classic kids story, The Giving Tree. And the car was happy.

But not really.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1981 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1981 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am

1981 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am

From the seller’s description:

1981 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am 4.9L WS6 with T-Tops and 4 wheel disk brakes. 1981 was the final year of the second generation body style made famous in the “Smokey & the Bandit” movies. This beautiful iconic muscle car has had a complete restoration from stem to stern about 1100 miles ago and looks absolutely fantastic. The vehicle has 90K original miles on the chassis and original numbers matching powertrain. The body is laser straight and the doors align and close without any sag. The deep black paint is show quality and pops in the sunlight with a touch of gold metallic. The motor was completely gone through and everything was either replaced or restored. This car has no exhaust, fluid, or oil leaks. Every gasket and seal is new to include BOP’s Viton 1 piece rear main seal and oil pan gasket. All of the hoses, fuel, and vacuum lines have been replaced. The motor has a new radiator, 180 degree thermostat, as well as new alternator, water, fuel, power steering, and oil pumps. The motor is run with 6 quarts of Amsoil ZROD fully synthetic oil with zinc to help keep the temps down and the turbo from coking. The car wears all new brakes to include; a new booster, calipers, discs, pads, and brake lines. The suspension is completely new and includes; shocks, struts, springs and bushings. The original turbo wheels were completely restored and wear new BF Goodrich 245/60R15 white letter radials all the way around. The TH350 transmission was completely rebuilt along with the original performance ratchet shifter. A Hurst racing solid shift cable was added and the transmission provides firm, positive shifts. The rear end maintains its original 3:08 gear set and was inspected and given new gear case lube prior to being powder-coated. A new fuel tank was installed and strapped up to a freshly undercoated bottom. A 2.5” downpipe was attached to the turbo which connects to a custom 2.5” Borla XR-1 Multicore exhaust with dual 2.5” tips. The car sounds fantastic and has no cabin drone whatsoever. The factory quadrajet carburetor was sent to Cliff’s for a performance rebuild and was given the proper components to run modern fuel and modified to allow the secondary doors to fully open. A new K&N filter rests inside the air cleaner and the cold air ductwork has all been updated with new fittings and properly connected to the air snorkel in the fender well. The turbo was given a performance rebuild and ceramic coating by renowned turbo builder G-Pop shop. The car is currently dialed in at about 12lbs of boost and runs very well. A boost controller has been placed into the turbo to wastegate line allowing the owner to easily adjust the boost level. The Turbo Charge Boost lights all work and light up in sequence as they should. The dash was sent out for restoration as was the gold gauge bezel and shifter plate. The black vinyl interior is all new to include; front and rear seat covers, door panels and trim. The carpets and vinyl mats are also new. A boost gauge had been added onto the lower console in front of the shifter. Double sided adhesive was used in order to avoid having to drill holes. The factory radio was upgraded with a modern board making the system blue-tooth compatible while providing the driver with an in-dash microphone and USB port. Kenwood speakers were added to deliver quality sound. There was over $45,000 spent in the restoration of this car. Everything is new, or has been either rebuilt or restored. This is not an original low millage time capsule being sold to collect and invest in. This car was built to drive and enjoy with the tops out and the wind running through your hair or over your cowboy hat. Every modification has been tastefully made to enhance the driving experience with modern conveniences while paying homage to originality. You will be hard pressed to find a nicer driver/show quality Trans Am.

1981 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am 1981 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am 1981 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am 1981 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am

Pricetag

Price
$29,900

Location Marker

Location
Ogdensburg , New York

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Pontiacs for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog