Open Diff – Do you embrace pop culture references to your car?

Open Diff – Do you embrace pop culture references to your car?

Image via IMCDB.org.

So you’ve got a car, and it’s probably been referenced in the movies or on TV somehow. Or in comics. Or in a popular song. And, of course, at every car show people want to know if your DeLorean goes 88 or if your Checker was Travis Bickle’s or when was the last time you fought dinosaurs in your supercharged Eldorado*.

It can be tiring, but then again, many owners of those cars bought them to celebrate their respective pop-culture references. At the very least, they were aware of the references before they brought their cars home, right?

So, here’s the question for those of you out there whose vehicles have somehow been referenced in pop culture: Does it irk you every time that reference gets brought up? Or do you embrace the reference wholeheartedly? Do you go so far as to buy every piece of memorabilia related to that pop-culture reference and dress up as related characters for Halloween?

(*For the record, Mark Schultz told us after that article that he never realized there was an actual sidepiped Eldorado before he drew his take on it, but it was entirely plausible he spotted a photo of the Alexander Eldorado in a car mag at some point in time.)


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1971 Honda N600

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1971 Honda N600

Pickle, the 1971 Honda N600 for sale on Hemmings.com. From the seller’s description:

Meet Pickle, a 1971 Honda N600 Microcar named after the previous owner’s dog. He sold this car to pay for his four legged friend’s vet bills and thankfully he beat his cancer and is happy and healthy to this day! This adorable car never fails to start, runs great and attracts more attention at a car show than any import or American classic. No wonder because its just so darn cute.

Modeled after the iconic original Mini made in England, the N600’s diminutive size complied with Japan’s Kei Car standards and was the first Honda automobile approved for import to the United States. It is powered by an inline two cylinder 600cc air cooled motor sharing design characteristics with Honda’s line of motorcycle engines. Weighing in at 1100 pounds it’s 45 horsepower make it surprisingly peppy around town and capable of holding 65 mph on the interstate with out too much drama.

This one starts right up and runs like a top. It shifts smoothly through all four gears; it handles like a go cart and tracks straight down the road. The front disk brakes will haul it down quickly when called upon. With a 9000 rpm redline the little guy is singing on the highway but makes a pleasant little sound around town. The interior is deceivingly spacious offering plenty of front seat room for 6+ footers.

Always in Texas, this little car is highly original and complete. Everything works as it should. The glass is all good and the windows open and close properly. The paint is an older respray in a color a few shades off from what Honda offered in a pale blue green, but still presents very well. There are a few flaws in the finish but there is no sign of corrosion or rust. The stainless and chrome is shiny and would benefit from a little elbow grease. The interior (seats, carpet, door cards and headliner) is clean and tidy too.

Pricetag

Price
Inquire

Location Marker

Location
Rowlett TX, Texas

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

See more Hondas for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Model T Ford Club of America to dedicate Bruce McCalley Memorial Library and Research Center

Model T Ford Club of America to dedicate Bruce McCalley Memorial Library and Research Center

The Model T Ford Club of America maintains a museum and library in Richmond, Indiana. Images courtesy Susan Yaeger.

If you have anything more than a passing interest in the Ford Model T, you likely have read something by the late Bruce McCalley. His works The Model T Ford Encyclopedia, Model T Ford: The Car That Changed The World, and From Here to Obscurity, the last cowritten with Ray Miller, are considered authoritative among enthusiasts of the Tin Lizzie. Now, the Model T Ford Club of America has announced that it is expanding its museum’s library and rededicating it as the Bruce McCalley Memorial Research Library and Research Center.

McCalley was a founder of the MTFCA and editor of the club’s Vintage Ford magazine from 1966 to 1991. He continued to write and publish until shortly before his death in 2012 at the age of 86. McCalley spent many hours in the Benson Ford Research Center in Dearborn, Michigan, unraveling the mysteries of the Model T’s 19-year production run. Until his death, McCalley was also a regular presence on the MTFCA message board, helping to spread Flivver facts in the digital age.

The shelves of the Bruce McCalley Memorial Library and Research Center will soon be stocked with 600 additional volumes, courtesy of Ron “The Coil Man” Patterson.

The vigor with which McCalley pursued information on the Model T has inspired others to immerse themselves in the lore of the famous Ford. One of those who has done a good job emulating McCalley is Ron Patterson, known in the Model T community as “Ron the Coil Man,” thanks to his proficiency with making the Model T ignition system new again.

Patterson, a longtime member and supporter of the MTFCA, has collected more than 600 books, pamphlets, catalogs, and other pieces of Ford-related ephemera. In the autumn of 2016, he approached the MTFCA Museum in Richmond, Indiana, to offer his collection to its library. His only stipulation was that the facility and collection be named in honor of McCalley.

Special features of the expanded collection are several rare and unusual volumes related to Ford history.

The addition will quadruple the number of volumes on hand and add some incredibly rare and unique items, such as J8: A Chronicle of the Neglected Truth about Henry Ford and the Ford Motor Company, written by Walter M. Cunningham in 1931, and A Ford Dealer’s 20 Year Ride: The Story of a Ford Dealer’s Joy Ride, Sleigh Ride, and Rough Ride by William P. Young, from 1932. Both titles showed founder Henry Ford in a negative light and are rumored to have been suppressed by the company.

A formal dedication ceremony and ribbon cutting are to be held at the museum on Saturday, November 4, 2017, at 4:30 p.m. McCalley’s son, David, will be on hand, and the public is invited to attend the ribbon cutting and an open house from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. Those who cannot attend the dedication itself can still plan a visit to the museum Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at 309 N. 8th Street, Richmond, Indiana.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

1938 water-speed record-setting Bluebird K3 is back on the water after extensive restoration

1938 water-speed record-setting Bluebird K3 is back on the water after extensive restoration

Owner Karl Foulkes-Halbard poses with the K3 after an exhilarating test run. Photos courtesy Lisa Beaney Photography.

Okay, so it didn’t go at its record-setting speed of 130.91 mph that was set on August 17, 1938, but after a 20-year-long restoration by power-boat collector and speed enthusiast Karl Foulkes-Halbard, Sir Malcolm Campbell’s 80-year-old Bluebird K3 hydroplane returned to the water and managed a speed of 52 mph in a test on Bewl Water in Kent, U.K., in early September.

Sir Malcolm had already established eight land-speed records at Pendine Sands in the U.K. and Daytona Beach, Florida, but his last record of 301.337 mph in his 2,300-hp Rolls-Royce Merlin-powered Bluebird race car was set on September 3, 1935, at the Bonneville Salt Flats. This record made Sir Malcolm the first man to exceed 300 mph in two passes at the Salt Flats. He commissioned Fred Cooper, of Saunders Roe, to build a speedboat using the same Merlin engine in his attempt to break the water-speed record of 124.860 established by American Garfield “Gar” Wood on the St. Clair River in 1932 aboard his boat Miss America. Wood had upped the record five times between 1920 and 1932 in several versions of the Miss America boat.

On September 1, 1937, Sir Malcolm and the K3 established a new speed record of 126.32 mph on Lake Maggiore near the Swiss-Italian border. The next day, he topped his own record at 129.50 mph. His last speed record of 130.91 took a little longer to accomplish; it was over a year later that his Merlin-powered Bluebird K3 was clocked at 130.91 on Lake Hallwyl in Switzerland. Campbell felt that the speedboat had been stretched to its speed limit and was becoming too dangerous to push further, so it was retired from speed boat attempts that same year.

Karl Foulkes-Halbard poses with a picture of his father, Paul Foulkes-Halbard, who died in 2001. The two began the restoration of the K3 together.

The Bluebird K3 was acquired by Paul Foulkes-Halbard in the ’90s and displayed at Filching Manor with other vehicles in his collection, and Paul had plans to restore the boat to its former glory. Upon Paul’s death, son Karl took up the mantle and invested a large amount of his money and time into completely rebuilding the engine, gearbox, clutch, and especially the hull, which had to be stripped down to bare crossmembers and reassembled to 1938 dimensions using newer composite materials.

After a 20-year restoration, the 80-year-old Bluebird K3 heads out on Bewl Water for a test run.

The U.K. newspaper The Telegraph quoted Mr. Foulkes-Halbard after putting the Bluebird through its test paces:

It’s a pretty wild experience, even at just over 50 mph. I can only take my hat off to Sir Malcolm Campbell, who was doing more than double those speeds. He was an exceptionally courageous man and an extremely skillful pilot.”

With the successful test under his belt, Karl Foulkes-Halbard plans to return to Lake Maggiore next year to attempt to recreate the first two speed records achieved in 1937 by Sir Malcolm Campbell and possibly duplicate his last record of 130.91, set at Lake Hallwyl.

Looking every bit as stately as the boat did when it set its water speed record in 1938.

Malcolm’s son Donald continued both land- and water-speed-boat record assaults in newer equipment in the following years until his horrific crash on the water in the Bluebird K7 in January 1967 in which he was killed while attempting to break the 300-mph mark in a speed boat. Donald Campbell set a land-speed record of 403.10 in July of 1964 aboard the Bluebird CN7 as well as seven water-speed records in the Bluebird K7 from 202.32 mph to 276.33 mph between 1952 and 1964. After the crash in 1967, divers found Donald’s helmet but were unable to locate Donald’s body until May of 2001.

The Daily Mail UK has this interesting story that is well worth reading regarding the locating, retrieval, and restoration of the ill-fated Bluebird K7 from Coniston Water in Lancashire, U.K.

Our thanks to Phil and Lisa Beany for use of their photo archives.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Corvettes for Chip to benefit amyloidosis research

Corvettes for Chip to benefit amyloidosis research

Elliot “Chip” Miller. Photo courtesy Carlisle Events.

In 2004, Carlisle Events co-founder Elliot “Chip” Miller succumbed to complications from primary amyloidosis, a rare, incurable plasma cell disorder.

More than a decade after his death, Miller remains a pillar of the Corvette community and his signature event, Corvettes at Carlisle, is the premier gathering of the fiberglass faithful. This year, the four-day happening, August 24-27, drew more than 4,000 Corvettes and a crowd of 60,000 people to the Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Fairgrounds.

Next month, Corvette aficionados will flock to Carlisle again for a benefit show to raise money for amyloidosis research. “Corvettes for Chip” will be held November 5 at the 30,000-square-foot Carlisle Expo Center. This is the first year the event has been held in Carlisle and it’s being backed by the York County Corvette Club. The show will feature a midday engine rev, Toys for Tots toy drive, bake sale, silent auction, and, of course, Corvette-themed vendors, as well as dozens of Corvettes.

We’re told that indoor space to show a Corvette is sold out, though there are some indoor vending spaces available. There’s still a great deal of outdoor space open at the Expo Center where vendors will also be set up and show cars will be on display. Registration is open now at CorvettesForChip.com and spectator admission is free.

The condition Miller died of, amyloidosis, occurs when an abnormal protein called amyloid, produced by plasma cells in bone marrow, collects in your organs. If gone untreated it can lead to organ failure and death. Miller was diagnosed with the disease in late 2003, and died at age 61, on March 24, 2004, while preparing to undergo treatment at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Miller and Carlisle Events cofounder Bill Miller Jr. weren’t related, but when the two met they shared a love of 1950s-era cars that led to a lifelong friendship. Most collector-car events in the early 1970s were geared toward prewar cars so the pair decided to put up $500 each to rent the Carlisle Fairgrounds and host a meet for later-model vehicles and parts. On September 26, 1974, Carlisle’s inaugural “Post War ’74” went off with nearly 600 vendors set up in approximately 800 spaces. More than 13,000 spectators invaded the fairgrounds too, each forking over the $1 admission fee.

That initial success led to the Fall Carlisle Collector Car Swap Meet & Car Corral — which became a mecca for collector-car enthusiasts. By 1977, the Millers added a spring event to the calendar and, in 1981, they purchased the 82‐acre fairgrounds.

Carlisle Events has since expanded into a dozen collector-car events in Carlisle, as well as in Lakeland, Florida. Chip Miller’s son Lance is now one of the co-owners of the company, as well as a driving force behind Corvettes for Chip.

“The Corvettes for Chip event is always a blast and I’m honored to be a part of it each year,” Lance said. “I’m really excited that the event will be hosted in Carlisle and I know my father will certainly be smiling down upon us on November 5. It’s wonderful knowing he’s still making an impact today, 14 years after his passing.”

For anyone who can’t attend Corvettes for Chip, photos and videos will be posted to the Corvettes at Carlisle Facebook page during the event and in the days following.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1973 Plymouth Road Runner

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1973 Plymouth Road Runner

1973 Plymouth Road Runner

From the seller’s description:

1973 Plymouth Road Runner ALL ORIGINAL TRUE SURVIVOR beautiful condition pampered for 44 years by the original owner. This could be the nicest untouched 73 out there anywhere. The car is a true time capsule piece. From the original tuxedo black paint to the beautiful black interior this car demands respect from all. You will be hard pressed to find a nicer survivor anywhere. Numbers matching drivetrain, 340 engine, 4bbl carb, 727 auto transmission, with factory “Slap Stik” shifter, 323 sure grip rear axle, bucket seats. This car runs super strong with no issues. No cracks or blemishes on dash or instrument cluster, head liner is perfect, interior has no tears or rips vinyl is soft and plyable. Carpet is in pristine condition, Shoes were rarely worn or allowed in this car. The original glass on this car is stunning to say the least. There are no marks or blemishes or chips of any kind. All glass still shows the Chrysler logo and is extremely clear, shiney and scratch free. The original black paint still shines like new and has no fade. All chrome and brightwork trim is nothing short of stunning and original with no pitting anywhere. The factory white vinyl stripe has some slight patina which supports the originality of this rare bird. This beauty has always been garaged and pampered by the original owner that bought is new back in Feb of 1973. The car has a beautiful paper trail. This gem drives straight down the road with no rattles or squeaks.The dual exhaust puts out a very low sexy note. This Road Runner has won 81 trophies at various shows in its lifetime to include 3 time 1st place show winner at Detroit’s infamous AutoRama for most original. This bird will be delivered to you with two sets of tires and wheels. The steel wheels with dog dish hubcaps pictured and the original Rallye wheels with the date correct good year polyglass tires. As you know these Mopars are rarely found untouched in this extremely nice condition. Feel free to contact me with questions. You are encouraged to have your own inspection done on this beauty. There is nothing here to hide. It is gorgeous and original.

1973 Plymouth Road Runner 1973 Plymouth Road Runner 1973 Plymouth Road Runner 1973 Plymouth Road Runner

Pricetag

Price
$39,900

Location Marker

Location
Willis Michigan 48191, Michigan

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Plymouths for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

The earliest known British automobile was built for breaking the law

The earliest known British automobile was built for breaking the law

Photos courtesy Bonhams.

Not intentionally, of course, but the brothers Santler couldn’t help but break existing British road laws when they first ventured out in the little car they called “Malvernia.” Still, they had to give it a shot and in the process may have become the first automobile manufacturers in Great Britain in a car that will next month head to auction.

To be clear, self-propelled road locomotives plied the country’s roads well before Charles and Walter Santler decided they wanted to build their own personal horseless carriage. Typically gargantuan and slow, the steam-powered locomotives either worked local farms or served as stages, hauling a dozen or more passengers at a time. Their proliferation in the 1820s and 1830s not only caused traffic problems, but also led to the passage of the infamous Locomotive Acts starting in 1861.

Like many entrepreneurs, Charles and Walter Santler decided to bend the rules a little bit in 1887. Nothing prevented the brothers — both engineers in their father’s steam-engine business in Malvern, Worcestershire — from installing a triple-expansion steam engine in an atypically small handbuilt steel frame. Where they ran afoul of the existing Highways and Locomotives (Amended) Act of 1878 (in addition to the lack of a man walking ahead of their carriage with a red flag) was in deciding to put a two-place bench seat atop the frame: The law required a three-man crew.

According to the Bonhams description of the Santler carriage, after a few spins around town in 1889, the Santlers shelved the idea, probably repurposed the steam engine, and didn’t touch the horseless carriage chassis again until 1891 or 1892, when they installed a coal gas engine, then, later, a small single-cylinder gasoline engine.

After the Locomotives and Highways Act of 1896 essentially repealed the earlier, more restrictive Locomotive Acts and spurred on the automobile industry in Great Britain, the Santlers continued with their horseless carriage experiments and even went into limited automobile production in the mid-1910s. Throughout that time, Charles Santler kept the old Malvernia around, trotting it out once a decade or so for some event or another.

Certainly due to its unique status successive owners struggled with the car’s narrative. Early documentation of the car was lost in a bombing raid in World War II; its owner in the 1950s installed a Benz 3.5-hp water-cooled single-cylinder engine, which remains with the car; and nobody appeared willing to deep-dive into the car’s history until Dr. Alan Sutton bought it in 1985 and documented the car’s entire history.

Since then, Sutton registered the Malvernia — since rechristened the Santler — for the road, finally making it street legal 100 years after its construction, and entered it in the London-to-Brighton Veteran Car Run multiple times. It has yet another trip to the coast scheduled for this year’s run, the same weekend Bonhams intends to sell it at the auction house’s annual car run sale in London.

The Bonhams pre-auction estimate for the car ranges from £200,000 to £250,000 ($260,000 to $330,000). The sale, which includes at least five other 18th 19th-century self-propelled vehicles, takes place November 3. For more information, visit Bonhams.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Joe Oldham, consummate car guy and Hemmings columnist, RIP

Joe Oldham, consummate car guy and Hemmings columnist, RIP

Joe Oldham in 2013. Photo by Jeff Koch.

Editor’s note: Author, Hemmings Muscle Machines columnist, and muscle-car authority Joe Oldham died at his Palm Springs home last Thursday. This tribute comes to us from Martyn Schorr, a friend of Joe’s for more than five decades.

More than 50 years ago, a very young, very humble Joe Oldham came into my office at Hi-Performance CARS magazine. He had his resume and writing samples in hand and was looking for a job. There were no open positions, but he impressed both my Managing Editor, Fred Mackerodt, and me. He really knew his stuff: key codes/part numbers for engine options, hot camshafts buried in parts listings, and inexpensive racing parts you could buy over the counter at Chevy and Pontiac dealership parts departments. He was also an experienced street racer, earning his cred on the mean streets of Brooklyn and Queens. I would have hired him in a minute had there been any seat not already filled.

My longtime pal Joe passed away in the home he shares with his wife, Nina, in Palm Springs, California, on Thursday, October 26, 2017, at the age of 74. He, Fred, and I have been friends for more than a half century and for years he’s been flying into NYC to have our annual lunch in Manhattan. This year, he planned the trip in May to coincide with the arrival of son Steve and wife Lauren’s daughter; Joe and Nina’s third grandchild. We had our usual laugh fest at our favorite Sushi restaurant.

Joe in 1969, with his Baldwin Motion Camaro.

Joe had recently written the Foreword for my new book, DAY ONE, to be released at the end of November. In the Foreword, he commented on how his relationship with Fred, High-Performance CARS, and myself started:

“From 1965 to 1976, I worked as a writer for Magnum-Royal Publications in New York City, publishers of Hi-Performance CARS, Speed and Supercar, and Supercar Annuals. As such, I lived through the Golden Age of Musclecars as an insider. With just a phone call, I had access to almost every Musclecar from every manufacturer.  I drove them, I photographed them, I street raced them, and I lived with them. And got paid to do it. If you were a carguy, as I was from the time I was a little kid, it was a dream job.”

“How did a dumb kid from Brooklyn wind up with such a cool gig? For one thing, I had the guts to simply walk in to Magnum-Royal offices one day and ask for it. That day I was lucky enough to meet Editorial Director Martyn L. Schorr, the author of this book, and his Managing Editor Fred Mackerodt. They saw a kid with a degree in journalism from New York University in one hand, writing samples in the other, and a background that included street racing a tri-power Pontiac.”

While Joe never worked for Magnum-Royal, he was an integral part of our team. His monthly TORQUE EAST column ran for a decade and his tell-it-like-it-is road tests and street-racing experiences helped our magazines grow and be competitive with the best the West Coast had to offer. He talked the talk and walked the walk. Over the years he owned and street-raced some really neat 1960s performance cars: ’59 Pontiac tri-power Bonneville convertible, ’62 327/340 Corvette, ’68 400/360 HO Pontiac GTO, and, his take-no-prisoners ’69 triple-black Baldwin-Motion SS427 Camaro.

There are probably few Baldwin-motion aficionados who don’t know about his Camaro that was stolen (and never recovered) not that long after he took delivery. I used his Camaro for three advertisements and posters – WANTED, OUTRAGEOUS & THE MOMENT OF TRUTH – as well as the cover of the 1969 Baldwin-Motion catalog.

Joe and Scott, with the tribute Camaro in 2013. Jeff Koch photo.

In 2013, Joe and son Scott – a respected automotive magazine editor, photojournalist, and hands-on carguy – built a tribute SS427 Camaro to replace the one that was never recovered. They revealed it at the Muscle Car and Corvette Nationals (MCACN). They also shared a vintage Pontiac Trans-Am.

As a columnist and contributor to our group of enthusiast magazines, Joe was involved in road testing, technical writing, helping chose our annual Top Performance Car Of The Year, and, together with Fred, created the first SUPERECAR ANNUAL in 1968. They also worked on our motorcycle titles.

In the tradition of our relationship, our sons, also in the automotive community, have been friends for years. Scott Oldham has a close relationship with my son Stuart, who’s also in the automotive field. He’s VP Communications & Public Affairs at Jaguar Land Rover. Steven Oldham is Northeast Region Manager at Nissan Communications in NYC.

Joe (L) with Martyn at MCACN in 2013. David Hakim photo.

In 2007, Joe wrote MUSCLE CAR CONFIDENTIAL, Confessions of a Muscle Car Test Driver, published by Motorbooks, and has written the forewords for two of my books: MOTION Performance, Tales Of A Muscle Car Builder and DAY ONE, An Automotive Journalist’s Muscle Car Memoir, also published by Motorbooks.

Joe Oldham never met a tire he couldn’t smoke and treated most traffic lights like they were Christmas trees at his home track, Englishtown’s Raceway Park. He’s been thrown out of GM’s Milford Proving Ground for doing smokey burnouts and banned for life from AMC new-car previews by Gerald Meyers, AMC Executive VP at the time. Seems it had to do with a test of a ’71 Javelin that showed photos of the test car losing it’s right rear wheel and brake drum assembly!

But there’s another side of Joe Oldham, In 2004, Joe Oldham retired from his day job, Editor in Chief of Popular Mechanics at Hearst Corporation.

Cathleen P. Black, president of Hearst Magazines, noted: “Joe Oldham is one of the most recognized magazine editors in the industry, and, under his stewardship since 1985, has kept the Popular Mechanics brand fresh, vibrant, and profitable. Not many 102-year-old brands can say that.”

He is one of only two people to have been elected president of the International Motor Press Association (IMPA) three separate times. IMPA is the country’s largest organization of automotive journalists. During two of his tenures at IMPA, I was proud to work with him as a Member of the Board.

Oldham also served in 2004 as chairman of the Board of Directors of the Automotive Hall of Fame and the nominating committee for the Motorsports Hall of Fame. He is a member of the American Society of Magazine Editors and was a founding member of the Environmental Task Force of the Magazine Publishers of America. Since May 2009, he’d been a regular columnist for Hemmings Muscle Machines magazine; his final column appeared in the December 2017 issue.

Joe was also a walking encyclopedia of 1950s-’60s rock-and-roll music, an astronomy buff, and, in the 1960s, played drums in rock bands. Most importantly he was a loving husband, father, and grandfather, and a dear friend. He will be missed.

–Martyn L. Schorr


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog