Hemmings Find of the Day – 1972 Land Rover Series III 88

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1972 Land Rover Series III 88

1972 Land Rover Series III

Short-wheelbase 1972 Land Rover Series III for sale. From the seller’s description:

I regret having to let go of my Series III but I need room in my carport. I’ve been lucky to own this beauty since August 2014 when I bought it in Nantucket. This LR is a fanastic Marine Blue color with perfect paint. I have both a CANVAS & HARD TOP. The truck had a BODY REBUILD by Bob Adler, Stephentown NY, in 2000 with NEW Land Rover GALVANIZED FRAME, all Stainless Steel Fasteners and Repainted Aluminum Body. It had a Mechanical REBUILD at the same time by DAP on Cape Cod when a FAIRLEY Land Rover OVERDRIVE was installed. (TOTAL REBUILD COST $25,000.) Just this month (Aug ’17) a new DIFFERENTIAL and CARBURETOR from ROVERS NORTH installed. It runs perfectly. This LR Series III was used in Natucket on the Cape until I adopted it in 2014 when I moved it to Mississippi. It has only been driven 670 miles since purchased in 2014 and only AROUND TOWN on PAVED ROADS and in local parades and NEVER OFF ROAD! The new set of 5 wheels has only 670 miles on them. I have ALL paperwork for the rebuild and all service records and even photos of the original owners in 1979 with the truck on a Nantucket Beach.

1972 Land Rover Series III 1972 Land Rover Series III 1972 Land Rover Series III 1972 Land Rover Series III

Pricetag

Price
$29,000

Location Marker

Location
Taylor, Mississippi

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Land Rovers for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Four-Links – tintype sidecar, the Love Machine, Sally, Brasil to Canada

Four-Links – tintype sidecar, the Love Machine, Sally, Brasil to Canada

Rob Gibson shoots tintype photos, which is remarkable enough, but he also does so out of a custom sidecar attached to his 1938 Harley, as we learn from this PetaPixel profile of Gibson.

* Apparently nobody knows what happened to the Love Machine from Cheech and Chong’s “Up in Smoke,” so Steve Kimmel set about building a recreation of the Impala, one that apparently earned Cheech’s approval, as we can see from Fuel Curve‘s story on the clone.

Still via IMCDB.

* One for the “visions of an autonomous future” file: Isaac Asimov’s short story, “Sally,” originally published in 1953 but set in 2057.

* Three young fellows made the trip from Brazil to Alaska in a Jeep in 1955 for little other reason than youthful exuberance, as we hear from this CBC interview with Hugo Vidal, the last living member of the expedition. No mention how they dealt with the Darien Gap. (via)

* Finally, the HVA’s documentary on the McGee roadster, one of three modified cars added to the National Historic Vehicle Register this past spring, turned into a wider look at the rise of hot rodding in the postwar era.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

A Bowtie for the back forty

A Bowtie for the back forty

Hmmm, you’re thinking, a Chevrolet tractor?

That was our reaction too when Diecast Direct’s Logan Skeele sent us these photos shot at Southern Indiana’s Lanesville Heritage Weekend in Lanesville, September 7-10.

OK, so this rig looks homebuilt, judging from the hardware holding the sheetmetal together and that’s definitely a 216 Chevrolet six.

From owner Dale Hall’s show sign we learned that the splash-oiled 216 is mated to a four-speed transmission and a two-speed rear, apparently all from a medium-duty Chevrolet truck. The builder? Someone named Nutter as evidenced by the custom emblem below the hood.

From there we let the magic of google take us to Farm Show magazine’s website where a revealing story from 2004 is posted.

According to the article:

“The tractor is a one-of-a-kind prototype, without a PTO, hydraulics, belt pulley, or power lift of any kind. (Hall) acquired the tractor in 1991 when he answered an ad in a local paper about a truck for sale. When he went to see the truck, he happened to see an old tractor in the barn. Right away he knew it was unusual, so he bought it and left the truck.

The previous owner remembered seeing the tractor sitting idle on his neighbor’s farm when he was a kid. Upon asking about the tractor, the young man was told he could have it. He later did some research into the unusual tractor.

After World War II ended, a deaf and mute man named Nutter built the tractor in his garage, hoping to interest General Motors in manufacturing it. It was well known that the company wanted to get into the tractor business. He used a 1 1/2-ton Chevy truck engine, transmission, and rear end — common parts that he thought would help keep the production cost down. When the prototype was finished, someone from Chevrolet in Detroit came to look at it. Unfortunately, the company’s plants were all operating at full capacity in the post-war boom so no deal was ever worked out.”

Meanwhile, also in 2004, over at vintage farm-equipment magazine Farm Collector, there was coverage of the Nutter/Chevrolet Tractor in the March issue. That story spurred readers to write in and help fill in some of the blanks. Here (slightly edited) from the May 2004 issue of Farm Collector we learned even more:

“The Let’s Talk Rusty Iron column in the March 2004 issue of Farm Collector about Dale Hall’s Chevrolet tractor brought a couple of responses that dear up some — but not all — of the mystery surrounding the origin of the tractor.

Steel White of Versailles, Kentucky, called Dale to pass along a few tidbits about the tractor. White said that Willie Lee Nutter Sr. owned a large farm south of Georgetown, Kentucky, where he raised expensive saddle horses. Mr. Nutter had one son, Willie Lee Nutter Jr., who was born unable to speak, although it’s unclear if he was deaf, as well. He never went to school, but was tutored at home and apparently was a self-taught mechanical genius.

White worked on the Nutter farm when he was 16 and was shown a tractor that Willie Jr. — who White remembers as being in his 20s at the time — had built in a fully equipped machine shop on the farm. The tractor had a Chevy engine and steel wheels. White also said the younger Nutter had built a grain binder and a stationary hay baler, both of which White used when he worked on the farm.

In 1944, White turned 18 and joined the Army. When he returned in 1946, he heard young Nutter had built another tractor, and General Motors was involved in some capacity. White believes the local Chevy dealer had some connection with the project, which later fell through for some unknown reason. The Nutters used the tractor on their farm for years afterward.”

So… a Chevrolet tractor? Well, technically no, but an interesting piece of backyard engineering and scratch building nevertheless.

(Thanks to Logan Skeele for the photographs, Farm Show and Farm Collector for the great historical information, as well as owner Dale Hall for caring for and displaying this interesting artifact.)


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1973 Buick Century Gran Sport

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1973 Buick Century Gran Sport

1973 Buick Century Gran Sport

From the seller’s description:

1973 Buick Gran Sport Stage 1, automatic, factory air, power windows and seat, positraction, bench seat, rock solid body, frame and floors, original spare, garage kept, never modified or altered in any way, Buick road wheels, all glass in crack free, dash and package tray are crack free with no signs of water damage,not restored, original survivor.

1973 Buick Century Gran Sport 1973 Buick Century Gran Sport 1973 Buick Century Gran Sport 1973 Buick Century Gran Sport

Pricetag

Price
$28,000

Location Marker

Location
Howell, Michigan

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Buicks for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

U.K. sets official cutoff age for classic cars at 40 years with new MOT exemption

U.K. sets official cutoff age for classic cars at 40 years with new MOT exemption

1971 Austin Sprite. Photo by David LaChance.

Even though the United Kingdom’s Department for Transport rejects the term “classic car,” it set a de facto 40-year cutoff age defining them this month as it decided which historical vehicles should be exempt from annual roadworthiness testing and which should not.

Expected to grant MOT roadworthiness testing exemptions to 293,000 more vehicles, the DfT decision, released nearly a year after a public consultation on the topic, applies strictly to unmodified non-commercial “vehicles of historic interest” 40 years or older with a rolling cutoff date.

Under current U.K. law, only vehicles prior to 1960 do not have to go through roadworthiness testing every year, and no rolling cutoff is in place. About 197,000 vehicles currently qualify for that exemption.

The DfT issued last year’s consultation on roadworthiness exemptions in response to the European Union’s own roadworthiness directive, which it issued in 2014 and allows member states to exempt any unmodified vehicle 30 years or older from testing.

While DfT officials considered several alternative approaches to exempting older cars, they ultimately made their decision based on crash rates. According to the data cited in the recent announcement, twice as many fatal crashes involved vehicles built from 1978 to 1987 versus vehicles built from 1961 to 1977; indeed, “the rate of death and injury in vehicles from 1978-’87, unlike the older vehicles, is comparable to that of the general vehicle fleet.”

For that reason alone, the DfT decided against setting the rolling cutoff at 30 years to match the EU’s cutoff.

“There could be a small negative effect on road safety (by establishing the 40-year cutoff for exemptions)… however there is no specific evidence that not testing vehicles of historic interest will lead to a safety risk materialising,” the DfT wrote in the announcement. “Per vehicle, the risks in the status quo of not testing vehicles until they are three years old and of not testing the general fleet every six months as opposed to the current annual frequency are likely to be higher.”

In addition, the agency pointed out that vehicles 40 years and older are rarely used and typically make short trips; that the modern MOT “was no longer relevant” to cars of that age, leaving garages ill-equipped to test them; and that a 40-year cutoff for roadworthiness testing exemptions would correspond with the 40-year rolling exemption for classic cars from annual excise taxes, instituted in 2014.

“Some vehicle owners may not keep on top of basic maintenance requirements if they do not have the deadline of the MOT to influence them,” the DfT wrote. “They will still, like all vehicle owners, need to ensure that they meet the legal requirement of keeping their vehicle in a roadworthy condition at all time.”

In addition to the 30-year cutoff, the DfT also considered and rejected the concepts of a basic roadworthiness test rather than the comprehensive MOT test for classic cars, biennial testing for classic cars, and a mileage limit for exempted vehicles.

Regardless of age, all modified vehicles will still have to undergo annual roadworthiness testing, as stipulated by the EU roadworthiness directive, as will vehicles designed for heavy hauling and for public transport. The Department for Transport classifies as modified vehicles any kit car, Q-prefix vehicle, or any vehicle with a power-to-weight ratio at least 15 percent greater than its original specifications.

While more respondents to last year’s consultation opposed the 40-year cutoff than supported it, “the chief argument against the exemption was that all vehicles travelling on the highway should have an annual test for safety reasons.”

While 40-year-old vehicles may seek exemptions from roadworthiness testing, the owners of the vehicles may also volunteer to have their vehicles tested. About six percent of pre-1960 vehicle owners currently choose to do so.

According to the DfT, the 40-year rolling cutoff for MOT exemptions is expected to become official in May of next year.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Derek Bell honored with 2017 Simeone Spirit of Competition Award

Derek Bell honored with 2017 Simeone Spirit of Competition Award

Derek Bell

Derek Bell at Sebring in 2008. Photo by Freewheeling Daredevil.

Derek Bell has won the 24 Hours of Le Mans a total of five times, the 24 Hours of Daytona three times, and the World Sportscar Championship twice. He’s been inducted into the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE), the Motorsport Hall of Fame of America, and the Le Mans 24 Hours Drivers Hall of Fame, and he has been an honoree of the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. On November 15, Bell will add one more accolade to his resume when he accepts the Simeone Foundation Auto Museum Spirit of Competition Award at a gala dinner in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

His career in motorsports began on the other side of the Armco in the early 1960s, when Bell served as a corner marshal at the Goodwood circuit. By 1964, he was racing a Lotus 7, earning his first victory, on a wet Goodwood track, in March of that year. Next came a rise through the ranks of Formula 3, then Formula 2, where his performance behind the wheel of a Brabham BT23C caught the eye of Enzo Ferrari himself. In 1968, Bell made his Formula 1 debut with the Scuderia at Monza, and between 1968 and 1974 drove in a total of 16 F1 races for various teams.

His forte, however, turned out to be endurance racing, and in 1970 Bell contested his first 24 Hours of Le Mans, sharing a works-entered Ferrari 512 with Ronnie Petersen. Just an hour and a half into the race, Bell narrowly avoided a collision with a privateer Ferrari 512 from the Scuderia Filipenetti stable, but in the process over-revved the car’s engine, prompting his retirement on lap 40. Following the race, Bell worked with Steve McQueen on the filming of Le Mans, narrowly escaping serious injury when his Ferrari burst into flames while staging for a shot.

Bell’s first win on the Circuit de la Sarthe came in 1975, with co-driver Jacky Ickx. The pair would repeat the achievement in 1981 and 1982, and Bell would earn two more victories, driving with Hans-Joachim Stuck and Al Holbert in 1986 and 1987. His 24 Hours of Daytona victories came in 1986 (with Al Holbert and Al Unser Jr.), 1987 (with the same co-drivers plus Chip Robinson), and 1989 (with John Andretti and Bob Wollek).

In 1985 and 1986, Bell captured back-to-back World Sports Car Championships, but his prowess behind the wheel of the Porsche 956 and similar 962 was best demonstrated by his 35 wins (including 16 in the FIA’s World Endurance Championship and 19 in IMSA Camel GT competition) over a seven-year period from the 1980s into the 1990s.

Sometimes the proudest moments come without a victory. In 1995, on Father’s Day, Derek and his son Justin, along with co-driver Andy Wallace, scored a podium finish at Le Mans in a McLaren F1 GTR. Though he never officially retired from racing (and still makes appearances at vintage events), Bell went on to a successful career in broadcasting, offering up an expert’s perspective on Formula 1 for ESPN and Fox Sports.

In addition to Bell’s Spirit of Competition award, Sally DeLorean, widow of John DeLorean, will be presented with the Jane Dusek Award, while Bill Warner, founder and chairman of the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, will be the evening’s master of ceremonies. The event takes place at the Simeone Foundation Museum, with the festivities kicking off at 6:00 p.m.; for additional information, or to order tickets, visit SimeoneMuseum.org/Events/Spirit-Competition-Award.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

This 1965 GTO ad evokes nostalgia

This 1965 GTO ad evokes nostalgia

Photo by author.

Longtime readers of the Hemmings Daily will recall me mentioning that my parents owned a 1965 GTO when I was very young. It was Burgundy with a black interior, the 360-hp Tri-Power engine, and a four-speed. That Pontiac made a lasting impression on me. Some of my earliest memories of being in a car are those of my Dad rowing through the GTO’s gears with the Hurst shifter.

In the late 1970s when I was about 12 years old, during a family visit at my grandparents’ house, I remembered that there was a large collection of old National Geographic magazines and a few other titles. They covered a lengthy shelf that ran along the lower section of the wall in one of the bedrooms.

I’d never bothered with them before, but I was starting to get more interested in cars, so I wondered if these National Geographic and other magazines from the 1960s and early 1970s had car ads in them. There are many reasons that most people would likely consider more important for reading National Geographic, so I’ll bet very few have looked through them just to find muscle car ads. Nevertheless, while searching those and the other lesser known titles, a smaller version of the 1965 GTO ad shown in this article caught my eye.

The Mayfair Maize convertible leapt off the page. There was the grandeur of the mountain range in the background, and there was a real Tiger…in the car! The tiger theme was prevalent in GTO ads at the time. Of those I’ve seen since then, one had a tiger jumping into the engine bay, another had a tiger skin on the hood, and a third had the GTO painted with tiger stripes. Others had a tiger tail sticking out from under the hood, but this one stuck with me for some reason.

About 30 years later, while tearing the wrapping paper off of a birthday present, the same 1965 GTO ad I had seen as a 12 year old was revealed. It was much bigger, so it must have been from one of the large-format publications of the day. And it was framed.

Without ever having known it was my favorite 1965 GTO ad, my mother had found it in an antique shop and thought that I would like it. Though she knew I was into Pontiacs and had a ’67 GTO and ’77 Trans Am, the chances that she’d choose this one out of all the Pontiac ads out there are still pretty slim. Just a fortunate coincidence, I guess.

The framed ad has prominent placement in my home office to this day. Every time I see it, I’m reminded of how much I like 1965 GTOs, how much I liked the one we owned, and how much I like that particular ad.

Tell us which vintage car ads are special to you and why you like them so much.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1925 Ford roadster

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1925 Ford roadster

Raw aluminum Hagemann-built 1925 Ford boattail roadster for sale on Hemmings.com. From the seller’s description:

Raw and Beautiful, truly a functional work of art and superior craftsmanship! This all aluminum bodied Boat-Tail Speedster Roadster was professionally hand built and currently owned by Jack Hagemann Jr, who is well known for his legendary metal fabrication skills & hand formed components that can be found on countless award winning show & race cars. Jack is a true master of the Hot Rod Industry and 1991 Grand National Roadster Show “GNRS” Hall of Fame Inductee. Own and drive a piece of history, 1 of 1 from the pavement up and the perfect addition to any collection, no disappointments…

Equipment

Body/Exterior: One-off hand formed design, 0.063″ 3003 H14 aluminum alloy, track T style nose & grill assembly, tight fit rolled edge fenders, one piece hood & removable vented hood-sides, side interior air vents, custom curved windshield, one piece removable rear boat-tail section, roll over rear safety hoop & nerf bar, formed headlamp buckets, recessed LED rear lighting & 3rd brake lamps, track style rolled underbelly w/airflow venting and PS Engineering alloy wheels w/Trigon pin-drive hubs…

Chassis/Suspension/Braking: Hand fabricated Hagemann chassis/frame/suspension (58.5″ front-track, 57″ rear-track & 102.5″ wheelbase) 1.5″ 0.126 mild steel tube w/torsional cross-member structure components, hand built chromoly A arms & suspension components, MPD parallel front torsion bars, Woodward NASCAR rack & pinion steering, QA1 front forward center shocks, rear triangulated four bar suspension & MPD cross-torsion bars, QA1 rear shocks and Attebury 4 wheel Disc brakes…

Engine/Power-Train: Ford Racing GT-40 302 cubic inch 320HP crate engine, aluminum cylinder heads, aluminum Edelbrock intake manifold & 4bbl carburetor, MSD Pro Distributor & ignition, hand fabricated ceramic coated headers & side exhaust, Griffin aluminum radiator w/electric cooling fan, Tremec 5 speed transmission, performance clutch assembly & Tilton hydraulic master cylinder and narrowed Ford 8″ rear differential (3:55 ratio)…

Interior & Related: Hand crafted aluminum alloy interior & bucket racing seats, Sid Chavers tan leather seat upholstery w/perforated center sections & wool carpet, aircraft style dash assembly w/push button start, Ford Racing instrumentation, one-off steering column, interior side & floor passenger airflow, racing lap seat belts and custom behind seat storage/access…

Pricetag

Price
$127,500

Location Marker

Location
Morgan Hill, California

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

See more Fords for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog