Hemmings Find of the Day – 1970 Mercury Marauder X-100

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1970 Mercury Marauder X-100

Garage-find 1970 Mercury Marauder X-100 for sale on Hemmings.com. From the seller’s description:

92,691 original miles
8-cyl. 429cid

Good condition, some rust around wheel wells. Original paint, most original parts except for brakes, tires, etc. Has been sitting in an attached 2-car garage since 2000. Hasn’t been started since then. It’s the would-a, could-a, should-a car that got left behind when things took a turn for the worse health wise. Original owner now willing to sell. Will not give this car away. For those of you asking, I’m not a mechanic so I can’t answer all your mechanical questions. The underside of the car looks pretty clean. There is some surface rust, but everything else looks pretty solid. I added a few photos of the wheel wells in the back and the underside. Happy to answer any and all questions. There is a custom trailer hitch attached to the frame of the car. The vehicle was moved(driven and running just fine) to the garage a long time ago to make room for a project car and everyone forgot this car was sitting over here. The battery was taken out long ago.

Comes with extra parts: bumper, quarter panel, hood, Inner and Outer all original brand new OEM Wheel Wells, and whatever is sitting in the trunk.

Pricetag

Price
$5,950

Location Marker

Location
Cleveland, Ohio

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

See more Mercurys for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Four-Links – San Francisco’s fire trucks, Mini-based beach buggies, Piquette’s window restorers, world’s tallest gas pump

Four-Links – San Francisco’s fire trucks, Mini-based beach buggies, Piquette’s window restorers, world’s tallest gas pump

San Francisco’s got an impressive collection of its former fire trucks, including one that fought the 1906 fire, but seeing them is problematic because they’re essentially couch surfing across the city, going from temporary home to temporary home, according to a recent San Francisco Examiner column. The caretakers for the collection have asked the city council for help with a permanent home, so hope for the collection’s future may still exist. (via)

* To coincide with his summer holiday, Jeroen Booij recently put together this look at some of the Mini-based beach buggies put together over the years.

* The Detroit Free Press this week took some time to feature the all-volunteer crew steadily restoring the windows of the Ford Piquette Avenue plant.

* It won’t dispense any gasoline, but the world’s largest gas pump recently went up in Sapulpa, Oklahoma.

* Not all of the Chrysler Turbine cars remained in North America during their public evaluation period. Chrysler sent one on a world tour, as documented by this video that King Rose Archives uploaded a few years ago and that Silodrome recently pointed to. Wonder if that Turbine is one of the cars that Chrysler later destroyed?


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Open Diff: Is the internal combustion engine on borrowed time?

Open Diff: Is the internal combustion engine on borrowed time?

Pontiac GTO

389-cu.in. Tri-Power V-8 beneath the hood of a 1964 Pontiac GTO. Photo by author.

On July 5, automaker Volvo Cars announced that every vehicle it launches after 2019 will be powered — in part or whole — by an electric motor. The next day, in an effort to meet ambitious pollution control targets, France proclaimed that new gasoline and diesel-powered vehicle sales would be banned by 2040, with ecology minister Nicholas Hulot calling the move a “veritable revolution.”

On July 25, Britain chimed in as well, announcing a similar ban on sales of new gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles, specifically stating that the regulation would extend to hybrid vehicles as well as those powered only by fossil fuels. The two countries aren’t alone: Beginning in 2025, all new cars sold in Norway must be electric or plug-in hybrid, the Netherlands is considering a comparable ban with the same cut-off year. Even states in Germany, home of the Autobahn, are discussing a ban on gasoline and diesel-powered new vehicles, beginning as early as 2030.

It’s easy to dismiss the moves enacted by France and Britain, as 2040 is, at this writing, still 23 years in the future. That said, one cannot mandate the implementation of technology that doesn’t yet exist, and for electric cars to become a practical solution to fossil-fuel-powered ones, a quantum-leap in battery technology must occur.

Proliferation of electric vehicles also raises a multitude of other issues. Can the existing power grid support the increased demand? Will countries need to invest in new power plants, and if so, how will that power be produced? These are questions that must be addressed, but not in this forum.

Are we staring at the sunset of the internal combustion engine? After years of talk about peak oil and declining resources, will it be environmental regulations that finally close the door on the technology that gave mobility to most of the world’s population? If fossil-fueled new cars are banned, how long before governments enact laws banning existing internal combustion vehicles, too?

Or, is it much ado about nothing, particularly if advances in battery technology (or other propulsion methods) and investments in infrastructure don’t materialize? Will we see the 2040 dates (or even the 2025 dates) pushed back as questions remain unanswered?


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

HOT ROD MILESTONES

HOT ROD MILESTONES

Three Hot Rods, 231 Years of Rod History

The Isky T, Elvis Car and Leham-Leonardo Roadster

Today there remains a large number of hot rods from the pre-war era (read: original hot rods), but few of those survivors can boast a story that these three roadsters offer. The trio of black beauties originated from Southern California at about the same time, 1940, and collectively they represent more than 230 years of hot rod history. That alone is an amazing fact, but of more interest, the original owners happened to be best friends when they built their hot rods, and they completed their builds at about the same time, lending each other helping hands from start to finish.

The two A-V8 roadsters were built by John Athan and Herman Leham, gentlemen who are now deceased. The T roadster was built by one of the most colorful figures in automotive lore today, famous camshaft builder Ed Iskenderian, better known as the Camfather in some circles, or simply Isky in others. All three men were instrumental during rodding’s formative years.

Beyond the personalities, the cars themselves remain rolling tributes to how hot rods were built before the days of overweight mail-order catalogs and ready-to-mount billet parts. Poke your nose under the chassis of any of these roadsters and you’re treated to a history lesson in how the shade tree mechanics that eventually became known as hot rodders skillfully made do with what components they could in order to complete their cars.

HOT ROD MILESTONES

History lesson number one: The Isky T. That unique grille and radiator shell? The combo is a cut-down and spliced-together version using two Pontiac front sections. The car’s juice brakes were pirated from an early Plymouth (Fords didn’t come with hydraulic brakes until 1940, the same year these roadsters were finished and on the road), and the 1924 Model T body rests on a modified Essex frame. That curious-looking engine? It started as an original (that is, 1932) Ford flathead V8 that Isky modified, using Maxi heads originally intended for commercial Ford trucks; the heads mount the exhaust valve/port topside, while the intake valves remain in the engine block. Isky fabricated the copper head gaskets himself, and to the best of anyone’s knowledge they’re still the originals he crafted back in the 1940s.

Ultimately, Isky’s mongrel engine pumped a compression ratio of 13:1, and the tri-carb motor propelled the car to a top speed of 120 MPH at El Mirage. Incidentally, those huge 16-inch whitewall tires are ancient, showing cracks in their sidewalls that were first exposed to air decades ago.

The Elvis Car has an equally colorful past. Built by John Athan, the A-V8 earned its nickname after appearing in the 1957 Elvis Presley movie Loving You. Athan happened to live near an outfit – Pacific Auto Rental – that supplied cars as props for Hollywood movies, which led to the Elvis movie gig. Following its appearance in The King’s movie, the roadster served as a prop in a couple other big-screen features, and later a gas station documentary. Athan was rather nonchalant about his car’s notoriety, too, years ago telling me: “I didn’t know who Elvis Presley was [at the time].” Athan said that, following brief instructions on how to drive the roadster, Presley did all right behind the wheel. “He could get around in that car,” cited Athan.

The car itself is a thing of A-V8 wonder, sporting its 59AB engine in front of a ’39 Ford transmission that leads to a ’39 Mercury rear-end packed with 3.54:1 gears, all hung within the classic ’32 Ford frame rails. This was all cutting-edge technology when the car was completed in 1940. And shortly after the car rolled onto the street, Athan pointed it to El Mirage for the Road Rebels’ dry lake meet where the car posted a top speed of 108.5 MPH.

And if you’re wondering about the Elvis Car’s odd-shaped windshield, here’s the skinny: The glass originated as the rear window for a 1939 Chrysler. Athan liked its contour, so he popped the glass out of the sedan’s molding and then fabricated a frame of his own. Pure hot rod funk.

Speaking of funk, in later years the car sat idle in Athan’s garage where rodents, spiders, dust, and even rain wreaked havoc on its black lacquer paint and leather upholstery. Finally, in 1997, Athan commissioned his friend Tom Leonardo to restore the car. Leonardo, who happens to now own the Leham A-V8, took the car to bare metal before giving it the look you see today. The car later was part of the Smithsonian Museum’s “America on the Move” exhibit in Washington, D.C., before residing at the Petersen Automotive Museum for nearly two years prior to reporting back to the Smithsonian again, where it remains for the time being following John Athan’s passing last summer.

Had Leonardo needed to reference anything about an A-V8 (which he didn’t) for the Elvis Car’s rebuild, he could have turned to his roadster, which was originally built by Herman Leham. Leonardo bought the car from Leham in the mid-1970s, and has owned it ever since. The ‘29 was meticulously built by Leham, who was a perfectionist, and Leonardo treats the cool little roadster with the same TLC to this day. After giving it fresh paint and upholstery, plus rejuvenating various other components, the car resides in its own garage stall.

Moreover, the Leham roadster’s chassis and suspension components are tight and in good working order – I know because I’ve taken several rides in the two-seater, the payback being a wonderful trip back in time. As for the car’s underpinnings, it’s pure pre-1941 hardware, right down to the 1938 Willys steering box, Kelsey-Hayes 16-inch wheels, Auburn dash, 1939 Ford taillights and running gear. And who among us can slight that classic push bar up front?

Speaking as an enthusiast, though, my affection runs deep for each of these cars because not only did I manage to photograph them simultaneously at the NHRA Museum in Pomona back in 2003, but I featured them independently in several of my hot rod books. The Isky T and Elvis Car first appeared in Hot Rod Milestones (1999) and the Leham-Leonardo Roadster was the cover car for Ford Hot Rods (1998). Some of the photos for this article were taken in 2003 just days before the Elvis Car was shipped to D.C. for the Smithsonian exhibit. But whether in a museum or out on the open road, all three hot rods remain fixtures in American hot rodding’s storied past.

By Dain Gingerelli

HOT ROD MILESTONES
HOT ROD MILESTONES
HOT ROD MILESTONES
HOT ROD MILESTONES

The post HOT ROD MILESTONES appeared first on Car Kulture Deluxe.


Source: CKDeluxe

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog Type 404

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog Type 404

1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog

From the seller’s description:

1966 Unimog S Type 404. This is a very clean, very original and complete cab and chassis that was imported as a fire truck. It has been converted to a working hydraulic dump bed.The dump bed is believed to be an original Unimog unit but the hydraulics are “Energy Mfg, Co.” An original PTO winch is included. This Unimog has spent the last several years in dry storage but starts, runs, drives, and stops. Very clean rust free unit with newer paint on the cab. Currently located in Sheridan WY. Clear title.

1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog 1966 Mercedes-Benz Unimog

Pricetag

Price
$16,000

Location Marker

Location
Sheridan, Wyoming

Magnifying Glass

Availability
Available

Find more Mercedes-Benzes for sale on Hemmings.com.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Owned by the family for 61 years, Briggs Cunningham’s own C-3 coupe heads to auction

Owned by the family for 61 years, Briggs Cunningham’s own C-3 coupe heads to auction

1953 Cunningham C-3

Photos by Erik Fuller, courtesy RM Sotheby’s.

Determined to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in a car of his own construction, Briggs Swift Cunningham built the Cunningham C-3 to meet the event’s homologation rules. A total of 25 Vignale-bodied C-3s, including 20 coupes and five cabriolets, were constructed between 1952 and 1955, and one coupe, chassis 5223, remained in the Cunningham family until the death of his daughter, Lucie, in 2014. On August 18, this 1953 Cunningham C-3 crosses the block in a no-reserve sale, part of RM Sotheby’s Monterey auction.

1953 Cunningham C-3

Chassis 5223 was originally intended to be a factory demonstrator, and production priority was given to customer cars already in the queue, delaying the shipment of this chassis to Vignale. It arrived at the B.S. Cunningham Company in West Palm Beach, Florida, in March 1953, finished in black and equipped with a heater and radio liberated from the Ford parts bin. Beneath the hood was a 331-cu.in. Chrysler hemi-head V-8, initially mated to a three-speed Cadillac transmission, but as an October 1953 internal memo stated, “Pressure on clutch pedal too heavy. Difficult to engage reverse, starting from cold.”

1953 Cunningham C-3

As a solution, the Cadillac manual transmission was replaced with a PowerFlite automatic transmission, which the latest update of the Cunningham Car Register states is the only example so built, as other automatic-equipped C-3s received Fluid-Torque transmissions. It was also one of the few to use a conventional intake manifold and a single four-barrel carburetor instead of the four-carburetor log manifold typically found on other C-3s, presumably because the car’s performance was of secondary importance to its drivability.

1953 Cunningham C-3

As Richard Harman relates in Cunningham: The Passion, The Cars, The Legacy, chassis 5223 was also configured with a Bendix Hydrovac power booster for the brakes, a radiator blind to permit faster warm up in cold weather, and electric windows, reportedly making it the only C-3 equipped with power windows. Its first owner of record was Briggs Cunningham, and the car appeared in a January 1957 issue of The Motor, which centered on Cunningham’s impressive Connecticut automobile collection.

1953 Cunningham C-3

Chassis 5223 was driven by both Cunningham and his wife, Lucie Bedford Cunningham, before being passed on to their daughter, Lucie Cunningham McKinney, in 2003. A 1978 inspection by Cunningham historian B. Bruce Briggs revealed that the car was “almost totally original,” except for the Buick Riviera wire wheels it continues to wear today. At the time, even the black paint was the same applied by Vignale in Italy, though the car was later repainted in its original hue under the daughter’s ownership.

1953 Cunningham C-3

In addition to a bare metal repaint, the car also received new red leather upholstery, matching the original, under McKinney’s care. Rightfully proud of her father’s contributions to automotive and racing history, McKinney frequently exhibited the car at concours events and marque meets, including the Cunningham Gathering at the 2011 Cavalino Classic and another such reunion at the 2013 Lime Rock Park Historic Festival.

1953 Cunningham C-3

Following McKinney’s death in 2014, chassis 5223 sold to the consignor, who retained the car’s wire wheels as well as the ladybug valve caps that were a signature of McKinney’s cars. At the Boca Raton Concours on February 12, 2017, the car received another significant accolade, earning the National Automotive Heritage Award from the Historic Vehicle Association (HVA), presented to vehicles “that are preserved or authentically restored and are among America’s most important automotive treasures.”

1953 Cunningham C-3

As offered in Monterey, the car shows just over 10,000 miles on the odometer, and still carries the original Chrysler Hemi V-8 and PowerFlite transmission beneath its hood. Described as “the most historically significant C-3 in existence” in the auction catalog, it will be presented at auction for the first time, remarkably in a no-reserve sale. While RM Sotheby’s doesn’t provide pre-auction estimates on no-reserve lots, other C-3 coupes have sold for as much as $1.2 million in recent years.

1953 Cunningham C-3

The Monterey sale will take place on August 18 and 19 at the Portola Hotel and Spa in Monterey, California. For additional details, visit RMSotheby’s.com.

 


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Ford marks a century of building trucks

Ford marks a century of building trucks

1918 Ford Model TT

1918 Ford Model TT stake bed. Images courtesy Ford Motor Company, unless otherwise noted.

Announced on January 11, 1917, and introduced to the public six months later, Ford’s one-ton truck chassis — later identified as the Model TT — was intended to fill a niche previously occupied by aftermarket suppliers. Originally available only as a rolling chassis, the Ford TT, which marked its 100th birthday on July 27, laid the groundwork for every Ford truck that would follow, including the perennially best-selling Ford F-150 pickup.

As soon as Henry Ford’s Model T was launched in 1909, aftermarket suppliers began to adapt it for commercial purposes, adding stake beds and van backs to carry cargo. Sensing the opportunity, Ford supplied its customers and dealers Model Ts in rolling chassis form for conversions, some of which included strengthened frames and wheelbases longer than the T’s 100 inches. For those seeking utility with less carrying capacity, Ford’s Commercial Roadster, introduced in 1910, offered a small pickup bed (which could be adapted for use as a flatbed) and a removable third seat.

By 1914, third-party suppliers were building heavily modified versions of the Model T chassis capable of hauling up to three tons of cargo. The company began to receive more requests to build a heavy-duty platform of its own, but Henry Ford found himself distracted by several projects, including the development of Fordson tractors and a December 1915 trip to Europe to negotiate an end to the first World War. His efforts in regards to the latter proved unsuccessful.

1917 Ford Model TT

1917 brochure image for the Model TT. Image courtesy of Old Car Manual Project.

As Pat Foster writes in Ford Tough — 100 Years of Ford Trucks, Ford sent a letter to its dealer network in 1916, advising them that conversion of Model T chassis for heavy-duty purposes was henceforth prohibited, citing safety reasons. While this may have been a valid excuse, Ford itself was in the process of developing a one-ton truck chassis, and hoped to eliminate the competition prior to its launch.

In January 1917, the United States’ entry into the war still seemed uncertain. With an eye towards business, Ford formally announced its one-ton truck chassis on January 11, proclaiming a base price of $500. A production schedule wasn’t announced, which proved to be a good thing: On April 6, 1917, the U.S. formally declared war on Germany. The conflict which Henry Ford feared had come home, and the automaker turned its attention to increasing production for the war effort. By the end of May, Ford had been given an order for 2,000 Model T chassis to be converted for use as ambulances, and ultimately, the conflict served as a proving ground for both the Model T and the Model TT.

1917 Model TT specifications. Image courtesy of Old Car Manual Project.

Though the war delayed the introduction of the Model TT, it didn’t prevent it, and the chassis reached the market in July 1917. Its price had risen for the estimated $500 to $600, but for their money buyers received a reinforced frame stretched to a 124-inch wheelbase, a heavy-duty suspension, and a worm drive axle that could be ordered with either standard final gearing (delivering a top speed of 15 mph) or optional gearing that allowed the TT to achieve the breakneck pace of 22 mph. A higher-output engine wasn’t available, meaning the TT got by with the same 20-horsepower, 177-cu.in. inline four-cylinder engine found in the Model T.

Buyers were also on their own, at least initially, for cabs and bodies. In 1924, Ford debuted the C-cab, named for the shape of its rear pillar, along with a selection of commercial bodies. A fully enclosed cab was added to the mix in 1925, and the number of body offerings from Ford was increased. By the time that Ford’s 1.5-ton Model AA replaced the TT in 1927, prices for the latter had fallen to $325, and total production had reached 1.3-million units.

1934 Ford Model BB

Hemmings own 1934 Ford Model BB wrecker, on the beach in Wildwood, New Jersey, for the 2016 Race of Gentlemen. Photo by author.

Ford continued to advance its truck product line over the years, adding features and capabilities demanded by commercial customers. The postwar years saw a shift in the market, and with many returning veterans moving from rural to urban areas, pickup trucks went with them. The F-Series debuted in 1948, with the number (F-1 through F-7) initially denoting its class and payload. In 1953, the F-100 replaced the F-1, initiating a naming convention that remains in use today.

1975 Ford F-150

1975 Ford F-150, the first to use to carry the F-150 name.

The sixth-generation F-Series arrived in 1975, bringing with it the F-150 moniker. Consumers approved, and in 1977 Ford took the sales crown from General Motors, an honor its maintained for the past four decades. Happy birthday, Ford trucks, and here’s to the next 100 years.


Source: www.hemmings.com/blog

Detroit Autorama

Detroit Autorama

By Dan Podobinski

The Detroit Autorama marked its 65th anniversary with the 2017 show, and as usual, the Motor City did not disappoint. In what other city would you expect to find a General Lee, with the sheriff in pursuit, jumping a huge ramp on a downtown street to kick off the opening of a hot rod show? Only in Detroit!

Upstairs was filled with hot rods, customs, race cars and virtually every other type of car and truck imaginable. The “Great 8” finalists for the prestigious Ridler Award were a hot topic as always and the Cavalcade of Customs featured some great, classic custom cars.

For fans of traditional cars, however, “the basement” is really what it’s all about. This show within a show has an entirely different vibe when compared to the more glitz and glamor focused upstairs. Down here it’s real hot rods, built in home garages and shops that are more dedicated to preserving the roots of this hobby. Art is also a big part of the basement, and numerous vendors from across the country line the “Artists’ Alley,” selling all sorts of goods dedicated to the lifestyle.

Continue reading “Detroit Autorama”

Tom Bailey Walks Away From Crash at Milan — Sick Seconds 2.0 Still Due for Drag Week 2017

Tom Bailey Walks Away From Crash at Milan — Sick Seconds 2.0 Still Due for Drag Week 2017

Tom Bailey, our 2013 and 2015 champion of Gear Vendors HOT ROD Drag Week, presented by Dodge, walked away from a crash at Milan Dragway yesterday. The situation began around the 330-foot mark when Sick Seconds 2.0, Tom’s street-ready Pro Mod Camaro, spun and hit the wall.


“The wheel wasn’t in all the way, I didn’t double-check it,” he admits. “It took off and everything was going fine, but I got out of it because it got a little sideways. I must’ve lifted up on the wheel as I was straightening it out and the wheel came off in my hands. Then it was at the mercy of which-ever direction I was facing, which was the wall.” Thankfully, the Skinny Kid-built chassis did its job — Tom walked away without a scratch and the mechanical damage was limited. The carbon-fiber nose will go off to Canada to be remade, Skinny Kid Race Cars will massage Sick Seconds 2.0 back into a quarter-mile dart, and a few coolers will need to be replaced — but you can still expect him to be at Drag Week with a few updates on that Steve Morris Engine’s billet big-block, with somewhere north of 3,000hp on tap.

Even before Drag Week 2017, if you happen to be hanging out at Roadkill Nights on August 12, you can catch Tom storming down Woodward Ave in his Sick Seconds 1.0 1969 Camaro. Plus, you can catch him racing in another Skinny Kid Race Cars creation, a blown 1972 Hurst Oldsmobile Pro Mod!

The post Tom Bailey Walks Away From Crash at Milan — Sick Seconds 2.0 Still Due for Drag Week 2017 appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

Source: Hot Rod Mag